Fire Damage
Restoration in Roanoke, TX

Request a Free Estimate

Elite Level Fire Damage Restoration in Roanoke, TX

Fire damage to your home is one of the most traumatizing, frightening tragedies a person can experience. This is especially true in apartment buildings and multifamily homes, where dozens if not hundreds of families are affected by fire and smoke damage. When a fire rips through an apartment building, the property damage can be catastrophic. But the damage caused by fires doesn't end once the flames have been extinguished. Victims are left wondering what happens next now that their belongings are destroyed. When will they have a roof over their again?

In these circumstances, prompt, purpose-driven fire damage restoration is key to reducing victims' financial and emotional strain.

The National Fire Protection Association states that a structure fire is reported every 65 seconds. When the fire alarm sounds, emergency responders answer the call for help with decisive action. But once the smoke clears, Atlas National Renovations' team of fire restoration experts step in to give hope to property managers, apartment tenants, and commercial property owners.

With decades of combined experience in disaster recovery, ANR understands the complexities associated with commercial and apartment building fires. We have helped the top multifamily groups in Texas recover their tenants' homes and belongings with care and compassion. If you're a property manager and you're still reeling from a fire disaster, know that we're here to help you too.

At Atlas National Renovations, our expert project managers and technicians play key roles in complicated fire restoration projects. We specialize in restoring Class A, B, and C properties like apartment complexes, high-rise buildings, multifamily buildings, mixed-use developments, large commercial properties, and more.

Service Areas

If you're looking for a top-tier fire damage restoration company in Roanoke, look no further than ANR. We're the top pick when it comes to large, detailed fire restoration projects because we:

  • Are a Trusted Partner in Restoration and Disaster Recovery
  • Adhere to OSHA Standards and State & Federal Regulations
  • Use the Latest Equipment & Remediation Techniques
  • Offer Innovative Solutions to Detailed Problems
  • Provide Seasoned Project Managers for Each Fire Restoration Project
  • Give Clients Clear and Consistent Communication
  • Work with Insurance Companies
  • Have a Knowledgeable & Courteous Leadership Team

Fire Damage Restoration for Apartment Buildings in Roanoke, TX

Owners and managers of apartment complexes know that the safety of their tenants is a major responsibility. Unfortunately, nobody can completely control when apartment fires occur. Fires in apartments and multifamily buildings may start small, but they spread quickly, often destroying several living spaces. These frightening fires destroy prized heirlooms, important documents, and can even be fatal. However, the work is only beginning once the fire is put out and lives are saved.

In the aftermath of a disaster, figuring out the next steps is hard. During this difficult time, it's important to be prepared. As a property manager or owner, having a fire damage restoration company on your checklist of resources is crucial.

Unlike residential fires, apartment and multifamily building fires add several more layers of complexity and stress. In these situations, you deserve a restoration partner that you can trust without question, and that company is Atlas National Renovations.

Disaster Recovery Roanoke, TX

With years of experience guiding our technicians and project managers, the ANS team responds quickly to your fire damage emergency. Using advanced protocols and state-of-the-art restoration equipment, we get to work quickly to repair and restore your commercial property to its pre-loss condition. While restoring your property, we always keep your tenant's care and comfort in mind.

Our fire restoration services in Roanoke are comprehensive and include the following:

  • Rapid Mobilization and Response
  • Overall Catastrophe Management
  • Emergency Board-Up Services
  • Debris Removal and Disposal
  • Apartment Content Inventory and Cleaning
  • Soot and Smoke Removal Services
  • Water Extraction
  • Deodorization
  • HVAC Cleaning and Decontamination
  • Shoring Installment to Secure Buildings
  • Interior & Exterior Renovations

Our Fire Damage Restoration Process

It's imperative to have someone with knowledge and experience on your side during a fire crisis.

When you call ANS, our fire restoration experts can help walk you through the steps you need to take once a fire occurs. This allows us to quickly gain control of the restoration project on your behalf. Once we have inspected your property, we'll provide a detailed report and scope of work for your fire damage restoration project.

ANS repairs all property damage caused by soot, smoke, and fire. Our IICRC-certified fire restoration teams construct the best plan to quickly get your building back to its pre-loss condition.

 Renovations Roanoke, TX

Because every property is different, each fire restoration project for apartment buildings is too. However, every fire disaster will have a similar process and will often include:

Contact ANS

Your fire restoration process begins when you call our headquarters. Our specialist will ask you a series of questions about the fire event that occurred. That way, we can arrive on-site with the proper resources and equipment.

Fire Damage Assessment
and Inspection

Our fire damage restoration team will carefully inspect the entirety of your apartment complex, from building to building and room to room. We do so to determine the extent of your apartment's fire, smoke, and soot damage. This step is crucial to developing a comprehensive restoration plan.

Board-Up Services

First responders like firefighters must break windows and cut holes in roofs to slow fire growth and save lives. Once the fire is out, our team can get to work, boarding up holes and constructing temporary fencing around the property.

Water Removal

If there is water damage associated with your apartment fire, we'll remove most of the water immediately. From there, we use air movers and dehumidifiers to help complete the drying process.

Smoke and Soot Removal

Within minutes of a fire, walls, electronics, and other surfaces are covered in soot. Smoke and ash continue to cause damage to every inch of your apartment building. That's why ANS uses specialized equipment to remediate smoke damage and remove odors. This process is often labor-intensive and can take time, especially for large fire damage restoration needs.

Cleaning and Sanitizing

Using a variety of restoration and cleaning techniques, our team will help clean restorable items and sanitize units for safety.

Restoration

Getting your apartment buildings to their pre-fire conditions is our ultimate goal. Depending on the size and scope of the fire restoration job, minor repairs like painting, drywall replacement, and new carpet installation might be needed. You might also need major structural renovations like re-siding, re-roofing, new window installation, floor replacement, and more.

Tips for Preventing Apartment Fires

If you're a property manager or own multifamily residential buildings, the thought of an apartment fire is terrifying. What starts as a small fire can quickly turn into a catastrophic event, with your entire complex up in flames. However, one of the best ways of preventing these fires is to know more about them.

Share these tips with tenants to help prevent deadly apartment fires:

Turn Off Heat Sources

Turn Off Heat Sources

Data shows that a large number of apartment fires begin with cooking. Often, these fires are caused by the ignition of common items like rags, curtains, wallpapers, and bags. Encourage tenants to keep their kitchens and cooking areas clear of combustibles. Never leave a stove unattended for long, and don't leave burners on by themselves. Unintentional mishaps like leaving heat sources on are common causes of fires that can be prevented with a little forethought.

Electrical Safety

Electrical Safety

Like heat sources, electrical malfunctions are also common causes of fires in apartment complexes. It's hard to prevent all electrical malfunctions, but you can tell tenants to avoid bad habits. Tips include never using extension cords as permanent solutions and never using a cable if the third prong is missing.

Appliance Safety

Appliance Safety

Appliances are a part of everyone's lives. They're also standard equipment in most apartment units. But if tenants don't take proper precautions, these useful tools can spark deadly fires.

Tips for Preventing Apartment Fires

No matter how large or small, fires are nightmare scenarios for entrepreneurs with commercial properties. Fire damage can completely ruin storefronts and offices, leaving charred remains and burned-up files before firefighters arrive. To make matters worse, soot and smoke damage ruin your businesses' furniture, HVAC system, carpet, walls, and windows.

To eliminate health hazards and restore your business to its pre-fire condition, you need to bring in a team of professionals with years of experience in fire damage remediation. At ANR, we use commercial-grade equipment and cutting-edge tools to clean up the aftermath of your fire and rebuild your property. That way, you can get back to running your business and providing for your family.

 Apartment Renovations Roanoke, TX

Share these tips with tenants to help prevent deadly apartment fires:

Remove Smoke and Fire Damage

 Home Renovations Roanoke, TX

One of the most common causes of large commercial loss stems from smoke and fire damage. Of course, these disasters cause injuries and fatalities. But they also generate tremendous amounts of damage, rot, mold, and harm to structures. Not to mention the devastation that fire damage has to the appearance and livability of the facility. Fire damage restoration companies restore - and also prevent - the root cause of the fire. Electrical outlets, wires, and other fire-prone items will all be addressed to prevent a subsequent disaster.

Highly Skilled

 Home Restorations Roanoke, TX

The best fire damage restoration professionals are highly-trained, exceptionally skilled, and properly equipped to deal with every aspect of a commercial fire. From handling major renovations to taking care of the lingering effects of smoke damage, pro fire restoration companies take care of it for you. Hiring ANR means you'll be working with technicians who have the knowledge, tools, and materials to get the job done right the first time.

Insurance Claims

 Multifamily Home Renovations Roanoke, TX

When you start the claim process with your businesses' insurance company, they'll ask whether you've hired a fire damage restoration company. That's because companies like Atlas prevent further damage from occurring and calculate an estimate of your total loss. You can submit this estimate to your insurance company, which may then provide you with resources to complete your company's disaster recovery mt-md-1

Discover the
Atlas Difference

Fire damage restoration is a crucial, complex process that professionals must perform. With decades of expertise, unmatched restoration quality, and the scalability for any job, Atlas National Renovations is well-equipped to be your single source for commercial fire damage restoration in Roanoke, TX. We are specially equipped to make difficult restoration projects easy for owners.

When a fire disaster strikes, you need a timely response from a trustworthy team of experts. Don't settle for a mediocre fire restoration partner. Choose ANR to get the job done right the first time. Contact our office today to learn more about our fire restoration services in the Dallas-Fort Worth metroplex.

Homes-for-Sale-phone-number214-814-4300

Free Consultation

Latest News in Roanoke, TX

Michael Ray Eyes Just The Way I Am Tour 2021

Michael Ray is living up to the sentiment of his new song “Picture” with the announcement of his forthcoming summer tour. Just the Way I Am Tour will kick off June 13 with a show at Caroline Music Fest in support of Luke Combs and continue throughout the fall months with other support stops alongside Sam Hunt, Chris Young, Ashley McBryde, and others. “I can’t wait to be back out on the road and be with all of you again,” Ray says in a press statement. “There’s nothing better than being with on...

Michael Ray is living up to the sentiment of his new song “Picture” with the announcement of his forthcoming summer tour. Just the Way I Am Tour will kick off June 13 with a show at Caroline Music Fest in support of Luke Combs and continue throughout the fall months with other support stops alongside Sam Hunt, Chris Young, Ashley McBryde, and others.

“I can’t wait to be back out on the road and be with all of you again,” Ray says in a press statement. “There’s nothing better than being with one another and singing the songs that have brought us together over the years, and I’m so excited to share some new songs with you that have come to mean so much to me. Let’s make some memories.”

Earlier this summer, Ray shared the inspiration behind “Picture,” written as a tribute to his late Uncle Terry with co-writers Hardy and David Garcia. “You know, pictures are like songs. You hear a song or see a picture, and it puts you right back in that moment. You can hear the people laughing,” Ray said. “You can smell the perfume. You can see your grandma in the kitchen. With these types of songs, this isn’t the first time the subject has been talked about. We had to do it creatively, and we knew we had something special.”

With last year’s lockdown, the country singer-songwriter also had plenty of time for self-reflection. “In a lot of ways, I realized that I was lost and putting effort and importance on things that were probably not important. Being able to be back home and hang with family and friends and actually be there, and not just in and out like we’ve had to be the last five or six years, it was a soul cleanser,” he remarked. “It sounds weird, but I reintroduced myself to myself in a way. Especially in what we do, it’s so fast paced, and you can’t put someone else’s story and compare it to your own. God made one of you, and you have a story. Don’t compare yourself or be down on yourself when God gave you this journey, and it’s yours. Own it.”

“Picture” and “Whiskey and Rain” sample a forthcoming, yet-untitled, new studio record.

Check out the tour dates below.

June 13 – Caroline Music Fest – Myrtle Beach, S.C. (support to Luke Combs)
June 14 – Wind Jammer – Isle of Palms, S.C.
June 18 – Dr. Pepper Park – Roanoke, Va.
June 19 – Country Fest – North Lawrence, Ohio (support to Sam Hunt and Russell Dickerson
June 26 – Smokin’ Summer Jam – Birmingham, Ala.
July 10 – Red River Valley Fair – Fargo, N.D. (support to Chris Young)
July 17 – Timberwood Amphitheater – Hot Springs, Ark.
July 23 – Power Plant Live – Baltimore, Md.
July 24 – Pinehaven Country Club – Guilderland, N.Y.
July 25 – Hampton Beach Casino Ballroom – Hampton Beach, N.H.
July 31 – Cam-Plex Heritage Center – Gillette, Wyo.
Aug. 6 – Antelope County Fair – Neligh, Neb.
Aug. 21 – Brown County Fair – Aberdeen, S.D. (support to Nelly)
Aug. 22 – Central State Fair – Rapid City, S.D. (support to Kip Moore)
Aug. 25 – The Pageant – St. Louis. Mo.
Sept. 3 – Ozark Amphitheater – Camdenton, Mo. (support to Brantley Gilbert)
Sept. 4 – Touchdowns & Tunes – Paducah, Ky. (support to Brantley Gilbert and Ashley McBryde)
Sept. 10 – Washington State Fair – Puyallup, Wash.
Sept. 18 – Swine N Dine – Paxton, Ill.
Sept. 23 – Island Hopper Songwriters Festival – Ft. Myers, Fla.
Nov. 14 – Tortuga Music Festival – Ft. Lauderdale, Fla. (support to Jon Pardi)

Delayed census data prompting effort to move elections in Raleigh, other NC cities from 2021 to 2022

Raleigh, N.C. — Delays with 2020 census data has prompted state lawmakers to allow dozens of cities and towns across North Carolina to push local elections set for this fall back to next spring. But Raleigh officials want to go further, delaying the elections for City Council and mayor ...

Raleigh, N.C. — Delays with 2020 census data has prompted state lawmakers to allow dozens of cities and towns across North Carolina to push local elections set for this fall back to next spring.

But Raleigh officials want to go further, delaying the elections for City Council and mayor until November 2022. Critics call the move a power grab by Mayor Mary-Ann Baldwin and council members, who effectively would get a third year in office.

"It’s all so they can stay in power," said Stef Mendell, a former council member.

Mendell said the public should have a say in when the next elections are set.

"I think it’s pretty terrible. I think it’s awful for democracy," she said of delaying Raleigh's elections for a year. "It’s very self-serving for this council, but I don’t think it’s good for Raleigh residents."

The U.S. Census Bureau has said detailed population breakdowns from the 2020 census won't be available until September. Some cities need that data to redraw council districts to reflect changes in their population since 2010, and the delayed data wouldn't give them time to do that and allow candidates to file and campaign before fall elections.

"Since you have to live in that district to run and you have to live in that district to vote for those individuals, that does require a review after the census data comes in to see if they need to go back and redraw their lines," said Gary Sims, Wake County's elections director.

So, the state House on Wednesday approved legislation allowing 35 municipalities to push their elections back to next March, when the statewide primary would be held. Wake County lawmakers got an amendment passed that would allow Raleigh to hold its elections in November 2022 and then keep them in even-numbered years after that.

The state Senate still needs to sign off on the proposal before it goes to Gov. Roy Cooper.

In addition to Raleigh, the bill affects the following cities and towns: Ahoskie, Cary, Charlotte, Clinton, Edenton, Elizabeth City, Enfield, Erwin, Fayetteville, Greensboro, Greenville, Henderson, Hickory, Jacksonville, Kings Mountain, Laurinburg, Lexington, Long View, Lumberton, Mooresville, Mount Olive, New Bern, Plymouth, Princeville, Roanoke Rapids, Rocky Mount, Sanford, Siler City, Smithfield, St. Pauls, Statesville, Tarboro, Whiteville and Wilson.

"Circumstances have put us in this position. This was not an easy decision, trust me on that," Baldwin said.

Raleigh needs more time to prepare new council districts because it's grown so much since the last census, she said.

"While this might work for smaller towns, it doesn’t give us enough time to redraw the districts, look at all the data, get public input to meet that March deadline," she said.

Meanwhile, cities and towns where council members don't run in single-member districts, such as Durham and most Wake County towns, can still hold their elections this fall as scheduled.

"We need to make sure everybody is aware of what’s going on because we don’t want anybody expecting to be voting this October but come to find out it’s next year," Sims said. "In Wake County, we do have 12 other municipalities [where] it’s business as usual – you’re going to have an election in November."

Cary officials said they don't want to delay their elections, either, saying they believe they can redraw districts without the census data. They're looking possibly seeking an exemption from state lawmakers.

North Carolina Main Street Communities Achieve National Accreditation for 2021

The North Carolina Main Street & Rural Planning Center at the North Carolina Department of Commerce has announced that 52 North Carolina communities have been designated as a 2021 Accredited Main Street America™ program. This accreditation status is Main Street America’s top tier recognition and signifies a demonstrated commitment to comprehensive commercial distr...

The North Carolina Main Street & Rural Planning Center at the North Carolina Department of Commerce has announced that 52 North Carolina communities have been designated as a 2021 Accredited Main Street America™ program. This accreditation status is Main Street America’s top tier recognition and signifies a demonstrated commitment to comprehensive commercial district revitalization and a proven track record of successfully developing an asset based economic development strategy, and implementation through the Main Street Four-Point Approach™.

“We are delighted to see that the diligent work of North Carolina’s accredited Main Street programs continues to meet the standards of the National Main Street Center,” said N.C. Commerce Secretary Machelle Baker Sanders. “This national recognition spotlights the daily work of our local Main Street programs which fuels North Carolina’s overall economy by increasing the economic vitality of their downtown districts with new jobs and more businesses.”

The following N.C. Main Street communities that have earned accreditation for their 2020 performance: Albemarle, Belmont, Bessemer City, Boone, Brevard, Burlington, Cherryville, Clinton, Concord, Eden, Edenton, Elizabeth City, Elkin, Elon, Fuquay-Varina, Garner, Goldsboro, Hendersonville, Hickory, Kings Mountain, Lenoir, Laurinburg, Lexington, Lumberton, Marion, Monroe, Morehead City, Morganton, Mount Airy, New Bern, Newton, North Wilkesboro, Oxford, Reidsville, Roanoke Rapids, Roxboro, Rutherfordton, Salisbury, Sanford, Shelby, Smithfield, Spruce Pine, Statesville, Sylva, Tarboro, Tryon, Wake Forest, Washington. Waynesville, Waxhaw, Williamston, and Wilson.

The performance standards set the benchmarks for measuring an individual Main Street community’s application of the Main Street Four Point Approach to commercial district revitalization. Evaluation criteria determines the communities that are building meaningful and sustainable revitalization programs and include standards such as, fostering strong public-private partnerships, documenting programmatic progress, and actively preserving historic buildings. Visit National Main Street Accreditation to learn more about the standards.

“We are proud to recognize this year’s 889 nationally accredited Main Street programs that have worked tirelessly to advance economic vitality and quality of life in their downtowns and commercial districts,” said Patrice Frey, President & CEO of Main Street America. “During an incredibly challenging year, these programs demonstrated the power of the Main Street movement to drive impressive local recovery efforts, champion small businesses, and foster vibrant downtown districts. I am inspired by their hard work and confident that these accredited communities will continue to help their downtowns flourish in the next stages of recovery.”

“The N.C. Main Street & Rural Planning Center is delighted with this year’s accredited communities. These communities have worked hard to build sustainable organizations. With these efforts, they are building vibrant downtowns and demonstrated the ability to pivot quickly when dealing with a crisis, like COVID-19. We commend these communities and their volunteers on the work they have accomplished in their historic districts and look forward to seeing their continued success,” said Liz Parham, Director of the N.C. Main Street & Rural Planning Center.”

Main Street America has been helping revitalize older and historic commercial districts for 40 years. Today, it is a network of more than 1,600 neighborhoods and communities, rural and urban, who share both a commitment to place and to building stronger communities through preservation-based economic development. Since 1980, communities participating in the program have leveraged more than $89.57 billion in new public and private investment, generated 687,321 net new jobs and 154,435 net new businesses, and rehabilitated more than 303,836 buildings. Main Street America is a program of the nonprofit National Main Street Center, a subsidiary of the National Trust for Historic Preservation.
Nationally, Main Street America programs generated $4.14 billion in local reinvestment, helped open 4,356 net new businesses, generated 14,988 net new jobs, catalyzed the rehabilitation of 8,488 historic buildings, and clocked 983,702 volunteer hours in 2020.

Since 1980, N.C. Main Street programs have generated $3.62 billion in private and public investment. In 2020, N.C. Main Street downtown districts generated 260 net new businesses, 99 business expansions in existing businesses, 1,262 net new jobs, 398 façade rehabilitations, 242 building rehabilitations, and recorded 84,017 volunteer hours.

For more information, contact Liz Parham, director of the N.C. Main Street & Rural Planning Center at 919-814-4658.

City of Statesville among 52 N.C. communities to earn national accreditation from Main Street America program in 2021

Special to Iredell Free News The North Carolina Main Street & Rural Planning Center at the N.C. Department of Commerce has announced that 52 North Carolina communities, including the City of Statesville, have been designated as a 2021 Accredited Main Street America program. This accreditation status is Main Street America’s top-tier recognition and signifies a demonstrated commitment to comprehensive commercial district revitalization and a proven track record of successfully developing an asset based econom...

Special to Iredell Free News

The North Carolina Main Street & Rural Planning Center at the N.C. Department of Commerce has announced that 52 North Carolina communities, including the City of Statesville, have been designated as a 2021 Accredited Main Street America program. This accreditation status is Main Street America’s top-tier recognition and signifies a demonstrated commitment to comprehensive commercial district revitalization and a proven track record of successfully developing an asset based economic development strategy, and implementation through the Main Street Four-Point Approach.

“We are delighted to see that the diligent work of North Carolina’s accredited Main Street programs continues to meet the standards of the National Main Street Center,” said N.C. Commerce Secretary Machelle Baker Sanders. “This national recognition spotlights the daily work of our local Main Street programs which fuels North Carolina’s overall economy by increasing the economic vitality of their downtown districts with new jobs and more businesses.”

The following N.C. Main Street communities that have earned accreditation for their 2020 performance: Albemarle, Belmont, Bessemer City, Boone, Brevard, Burlington, Cherryville, Clinton, Concord, Eden, Edenton, Elizabeth City, Elkin, Elon, Fuquay-Varina, Garner, Goldsboro, Hendersonville, Hickory, Kings Mountain, Lenoir, Laurinburg, Lexington, Lumberton, Marion, Monroe, Morehead City, Morganton, Mount Airy, New Bern, Newton, North Wilkesboro, Oxford, Reidsville, Roanoke Rapids, Roxboro, Rutherfordton, Salisbury, Sanford, Shelby, Smithfield, Spruce Pine, Statesville, Sylva, Tarboro, Tryon, Wake Forest, Washington. Waynesville, Waxhaw, Williamston, and Wilson.

The performance standards set the benchmarks for measuring an individual Main Street community’s application of the Main Street Four Point Approach to commercial district revitalization. Evaluation criteria determines the communities that are building meaningful and sustainable revitalization programs and include standards such as, fostering strong public-private partnerships, documenting programmatic progress, and actively preserving historic buildings. Visit National Main Street Accreditation to learn more about the standards.

“We are proud to recognize this year’s 889 nationally accredited Main Street programs that have worked tirelessly to advance economic vitality and quality of life in their downtowns and commercial districts,” said Patrice Frey, president & CEO of Main Street America. “During an incredibly challenging year, these programs demonstrated the power of the Main Street movement to drive impressive local recovery efforts, champion small businesses, and foster vibrant downtown districts. I am inspired by their hard work and confident that these accredited communities will continue to help their downtowns flourish in the next stages of recovery.”

“The N.C. Main Street & Rural Planning Center is delighted with this year’s accredited communities. These communities have worked hard to build sustainable organizations. With these efforts, they are building vibrant downtowns and demonstrated the ability to pivot quickly when dealing with a crisis, like COVID-19. We commend these communities and their volunteers on the work they have accomplished in their historic districts and look forward to seeing their continued success,” said Liz Parham, Director of the N.C. Main Street & Rural Planning Center.”

Main Street America has been helping revitalize older and historic commercial districts for 40 years. Today, it is a network of more than 1,600 neighborhoods and communities, rural and urban, who share both a commitment to place and to building stronger communities through preservation-based economic development.

Since 1980, communities participating in the program have leveraged more than $89.57 billion in new public and private investment, generated 687,321 net new jobs and 154,435 net new businesses, and rehabilitated more than 303,836 buildings. Main Street America is a program of the nonprofit National Main Street Center, a subsidiary of the National Trust for Historic Preservation.

Nationally, Main Street America programs generated $4.14 billion in local reinvestment, helped open 4,356 net new businesses, generated 14,988 net new jobs, catalyzed the rehabilitation of 8,488 historic buildings, and clocked 983,702 volunteer hours in 2020.

Since 1980, N.C. Main Street programs have generated $3.62 billion in private and public investment. In 2020, N.C. Main Street downtown districts generated 260 net new businesses, 99 business expansions in existing businesses, 1,262 net new jobs, 398 façade rehabilitations, 242 building rehabilitations, and recorded 84,017 volunteer hours.

People in the news, June 15

Allegro Senior Living announces 2 new VPs, 6 promotions Allegro Senior Living of St. Louis, including its wholly owned subsidiaries, Allegro Development Company and Allegro Management Co., has announced the promotion and addition of new leaders. Joseph Miklich has been promoted to president, John LeFauve has been promoted to senior vice president of design and construction, and both John Kratochvil and Sproule Love have been named vice...

Allegro Senior Living announces 2 new VPs, 6 promotions

Allegro Senior Living of St. Louis, including its wholly owned subsidiaries, Allegro Development Company and Allegro Management Co., has announced the promotion and addition of new leaders.

Joseph Miklich has been promoted to president, John LeFauve has been promoted to senior vice president of design and construction, and both John Kratochvil and Sproule Love have been named vice president of development and acquisition. Additionally, Brandi Sharp has been promoted to vice president of sales, and Christy Reynolds has been promoted to vice president of administration.

New to Allegro Senior Living are Michele Hoeft, vice president of marketing, and Gabrielle Anderson, vice president of operations.

Acts Retirement–Life Communities appoints three leaders

Susan Ahern, Gary Ginter and Peggy Valdivia were appointed or promoted to the leadership of Acts Retirement-Life Communities, Fort Washington, PA, effective June 1.

Ahern has been appointed senior vice president and chief financial officer. She has been with the company since 2000, most recently serving as vice president and controller.

Ahern is a certified public accountant and a certified management accountant and holds a MBA degree from LaSalle University. She is also a fellow of the Larry Minnix Leadership Academy of LeadingAge.

Ginter has been promoted to senior vice president of procurement and contract management. He has been with the company since 1989 and has 40 years of experience in the healthcare procurement and supply chain management fields. He has an MBA from Eastern University.

Valdivia has been appointed as vice president and controller. She joined the company in 2006, most recently holding the position of corporate director of accounting. She has an MBA from Eastern University and is a fellow of the Larry Minnix Leadership Academy of LeadingAge.

Maplewood names corporate director of resident care, regional director of resident services for Connecticut

Dawn Jones has joined Maplewood Senior Living as corporate director of resident care, and Annette Cochefski is the new regional director of resident services for Connecticut.

Jones, a board-certified nurse, will supervise the implementation of Maplewood’s standards of resident care, working to ensure that all residents are overseen in the most efficient way, with an emphasis on quality of life, safe aging and an optimal healthy lifestyle.

Jones has more than 15 years of assisted living experience, having previously been director of nursing as well as an executive director, and then a regional nurse covering several communities in a portfolio. She received an Associate of Science in Nursing degree from the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey and a Bachelor of Science in Nursing degree from Felician University.

Cochefski most recently was director of clinical services at Brookdale Senior Living. She has more than 25 years of multistate clinical responsibilities. Prior to her role at Brookdale, she held various multi-site positions with Benchmark Senior Living, Maxim Healthcare Service, Amedysis Home Care, and the BCBS Association. Cochefski is a board member of the Connecticut Assisted Living Association.

Lexington Square names Dee Novak senior director of sales and marketing

Dee Novak is the new senior director of sales and marketing for Lexington Square Senior Living communities in Lombard and Elmhurst, IL.

Novak’s background includes operating her own design firm and serving in a marketing position at a senior living community in Palatine, IL. She also formerly was a transition specialist, traveling the country for various owners and management companies in senior living.

Five Star Senior Living names 2 directors

Donna D. Fraiche and Gerard M. Martin were elected independent directors of Five Star Senior Living of Newton, MA, with 82.8% and 82.7% of shares voted for, respectively, at the 2021 Annual Meeting of Stockholders.

Laurel Circle hires outreach liaison, director of nursing

Cynthia Ryan and Tigi Kanu have been named outreach liaison and director of nursing, respectively, of Laurel Circle, Bridgewater, NJ.

Ryan has more than 25 years of experience driving levels of customer service, event and program development, funding, compliance, community outreach and marketing, and volunteer management. In her new role, she will be in charge of connecting the company and its residents in the broader community via sponsorship engagements and forming relationships with businesses, individuals and other community organizations. Most recently, Ryan was manager of sales and marketing for a Brookdale Senior Living community in Palm Coast, FL.

Kanu has 21 years of community nursing care experience. Before joining the Laurel Circle, she was director of nursing at Rose Mountain Care Center, where she provided supervision to a 112-skilled bed facility.

Friendship appoints Amber Duncan director of dining services

Amber Duncan has been appointed director of dining services at Friendship Health and Rehab Center of Friendship, Roanoke, VA.

Duncan had been the retail dining and nutrition director of Carilion Roanoke Memorial Hospital since 2008. In this role, she oversaw nine different retail cafes, and she supervised, trained and developed a culinary kitchen and dining leadership team. She also planned and executed culinary events and entrees on four-week rotations every quarter while collaborating with the central kitchen, dieticians and preferred vendors.

Before working at Carilion, she was the owner and operator of Reds, Wines and Blues Restaurant and was the certified executive chef at The Blackwater Cafe. She also was a premier culinary creation top 10 winner in 2019, and she received the American Culinary Federation’s culinary competition silver award in 2017.

Duncan has an undergraduate degree in information technology and is working toward a degree in integrative nutrition from the University of Phoenix.

Holleran Consulting has new president, Chris Fares Walley; Michele Holleran remains CEO

Christine “Chris” M. Fares Walley has been named president and project manager of Holleran Consulting, it was announced following Spectrum Consultants’ acquisition of Holleran. The acquisition became final April 30.

Walley moves onto the position after being with Gastonia, NC-based Spectrum for more than two years.

Before joining Spectrum, Walley was the director of marketing, sales and communications for Trinity Health PACE (Program of All-Inclusive Care for the Elderly) in Michigan, where she guided the PACE programs in all states of development to achieve enrollment goals and brand recognition nationwide.

Michele Holleran will remain CEO of Holleran Consulting for three years.

Erdman announces two leadership promotions

Scott Nugent and Paul DuCharme have been promoted to senior vice president of operations and vice president of architecture and engineering, respectively, at Erdman of Madison, WI.

Nugent began his career at the company in 2016. He will spearhead the company’s program management, preconstruction and other operational efforts.

DuCharme has been with the company for more than 30 years. In his new role, DuCharme will be responsible for providing leadership and management related to project resourcing, mentoring, coaching and development, among other areas.

Disclaimer:

This website publishes news articles that contain copyrighted material whose use has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. The non-commercial use of these news articles for the purposes of local news reporting constitutes "Fair Use" of the copyrighted materials as provided for in Section 107 of the US Copyright Law.