Water Damage
Restoration in Allen, TX

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Disaster Recovery Done Right: Trust Atlas for Commercial Water Damage Restoration in Allen, TX.

When you own a business, property damage is an unfortunate occurrence that happens all too often. Property damage can be caused by any number of disasters, both natural and man-made. Most often, however, property damage happens from an excess of water. From very heavy rainstorms to broken pipes, water damage can be incredibly harmful not just for your storefront but for your customers.

When water spreads through your commercial property, it happens quickly, causing damage as it moves. At the same time, furnishings and porous materials soak up moisture. In just a short amount of time, you could be dealing with warping, rotting, and even mold growth. That's why water damage remediation is so important - to address your current damage and prevent water from making your business unsafe.

At Atlas National Renovations, we know that dealing with water damage seems like a losing effort on your own. But when you trust our water damage restoration team, you don't have to lose hope. We provide comprehensive water remediation services for businesses of all size in Texas. From the first time we lay eyes on your water damage to the time we mitigate your problem, we're here for you. With a team of IICRC certified technicians and innovative restoration tools at our disposal, we specialize in making your business safe again.

Unlike some of our competitors, we are fiercely dedicated to our clients and aim to exceed their expectations with the highest quality water damage restoration services in Allen, TX. When water damage hits your business, time is of the essence, which is why we get to work quickly and efficiently by assessing the damage to your property. Once we know the extent of your water damage, we'll consult with you about its severity and detail the next steps you should take so you can make an informed purchasing decision.

With decades of combined experience, there is no disaster cleanup project too complex or large for our team to handle. We assist small businesses, large commercial entities, and even multi-family apartment complexes. Our clients trust Atlas National Renovations to keep them dry, safe, and secure, and it would be our pleasure to help do the same for you.

In addition to our reliability and quality of work, our customers choose us over others because we offer:

Service Areas

Fair, Accurate Work Estimates

We drain water from your property, not money from your bank account.

Clear, Constant Communication

When you work with Atlas, you're never left wondering what's happening with your commercial property.

Detailed Deadlines and Schedules

We're meticulous about sticking to schedules and meeting deadlines. You can always expect us to be on time and ready to work.

Experienced Project Managers

We assign seasoned, hardworking project managers for each of our projects. When you work with Atlas, you're working with the best.

Courteous and Knowledgeable Leadership

Excellence starts at the top, and our leadership team is the best in the business.

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What is Water Damage Restoration in in Allen, TX

If you're currently dealing with serious water damage from a flood, broken pipe, or other cause, you're probably not sure what to do next. While it's understandable to feel panicky, it's important that you have the water removed as quickly as possible. When structural damage and health hazards are at play, time is of the essence. The longer you wait, the worse the damage will get. The damage you see with your eyes is usually the tip of the iceberg - most water damage gets deep in your carpets and walls fast.

Atlas' water damage restoration services are focused on restoring and repairing the damage that water causes to commercial property. The primary purpose of our restoration services is to return your property to the condition it was in prior to the damage. Once your water damage has been mitigated, our team swoops in to begin the restoration process.

Depending on the scope and severity of your water damage, common water damage restoration services can include:

  • Damaged Flooring and Wall Replacement
  • Damaged Roof Restoration
  • Mold Remediation
  • Humidity and Moisture Testing

While little can be done to predict natural disasters, there are common signs you can keep an eye on to prevent serious water damage from occurring.

Disaster Recovery Allen, TX

Common Signs of Commercial Water Damage in Allen, TX

There's no convenient time to be sidelined with water damage when it comes to your commercial property and business. Water damage to your commercial or industrial property is particularly devastating because every hour that your business is closed means lost revenue and productivity. You do not just have to deal with damage to the structural integrity of your building - you have to deal with the disruption of service to your loyal customers.

The good news? Atlas is here when you need us most, with a team of highly-trained technicians and unmatched water damage restoration expertise. We're ready to tackle your problem and solve it in an efficient, effective manner, so you can keep your doors open and your clients happy.

As a business owner, you know that one of the best ways to prevent a disaster is to nip it in the bud before it gets out of hand. For that reason, keep an eye out for the following signs of water damage to your commercial property:

 Renovations Allen, TX
Look for Mold

Look for Mold:

Mold can begin to grow just a day or two after water has taken hold of your business. If you see small signs of mold growth in an area where you suspect a leak, contact Atlas National Renovations ASAP to diagnose the problem.

Check Your Pipes

Check Your Pipes:

If it's safe to do so, check out the piping inside and outside your commercial property. You want to keep a keen eye out for oxidation and corrosion around pipe fixtures. While you're at it, check your water heater for rust too. Corrosion or rust is a telltale sign of a water leak.

Check for Rings

Check for Rings:

Dark spots on walls and ceilings usually indicate water damage. If you see rings around a stain, the damage is probably older. Several rings with different shades of color mean an intermittent issue, where the area has been soaked and dried several times.

Understand Your Property

Understand Your Property:

This is more of a suggestion than a sign. As the commercial property owner, you should know your building's pipe system. You should know what is old and new and what areas may be at risk for water damage. Keep an extra-close eye on areas that have a higher potential for leaks, especially during rainstorms.

Benefits of Commercial Water Damage Restoration
in Allen, TX

When water invades your business or commercial property, you don't have much time to ponder your next course of action. While some business owners opt to try DIY water damage restoration, in most cases, they end up with more damage and expenses than before their leak. For the most effective, comprehensive solution to water damage, it's important that you hire a professional. At Atlas National Renovations, our primary focus is assisting business owners and commercial property managers with water damage restoration. We've been doing it for years, and we can help you too.

Here are just a few of the most common benefits we hear from past customers:

 Apartment Renovations Allen, TX
Safe Shopping Experience

Safe Shopping Experience

If you own a business, the health and safety of your customers is of utmost importance. When water damage occurs inside your storefront, you could be dealing with more than property damage. Depending on the severity of your issue, contaminants and microorganisms may be present, putting your customers' health at risk. When you trust a professional water damage restoration company like Atlas to remediate your water leak, you're not just putting a stop to the leak. Our team will clean and sanitize your business, making it safe for customers to continue shopping at your store.

Quick Response Time

Quick Response Time

Water damage can create unbearable conditions in your commercial property. As such, your water restoration company must be quick to respond. Professional water damage companies like Atlas respond quickly and can clean up water, dry and disinfect the area, and make necessary repairs. Because we have an entire team of pros and industry-leading equipment, we can be on site in minutes.

Less Damage, Better Costs

Less Damage, Better Costs

Water damage can be very expensive. Sometimes, it only takes a couple of hours to result in heavy losses. How soon you call the experts could mean the difference between painting over a water stain and having to rebuild an entire area of damaged drywall. When you call Atlas immediately, clients often reduce the cost of water damage restoration and overall building damage.

Capital Expenditure Services

In addition to our disaster recovery services, we also offer large-scale upgrades and improvements for your capital expenditures. If you own or manage a large commercial building or a multi-family property, you need to make sure your capital expenditures maintain present operating levels and foster your company's future growth.

At Atlas National Renovations, class A, B, and C properties are our bread and butter. We take the time to understand our customer's needs and expectations from the start so we can deliver outstanding results. If you're looking for a top-tier contractor to do the job right the first time, look no further than Atlas. Our customers love our team because we make large, highly-complicated projects easy to finish.

If you're looking to invest in the future of your business, know that we are here to help with projects like these:

  • High Volume Unit Upgrades and Improvements
  • Amenity Upgrades and Conversions
  • Common Area Improvements
  • High Volume Carpet, LVT, and Tile Installation
  • Courtyards and Hardscapes
  • Package Room and Mail Center Upgrades and Additions
  • Fitness Center Upgrades and Improvements
  • Dog Parks and Pet Stations
  • Signage Improvements and Additions
  • LED Lighting and Electrical Upgrades

Fitness Center Upgrades
and Improvements

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Multi-Family Building Deficiencies and Restoration Services

New multi-family properties are entering the market every day. That means that older communities must be renovated to keep up with modern demands and tenant needs. Upgrades to amenities, aesthetics and even structural changes help assets stay up-to-date. At the same time, damages from leaks and storms must be addressed. If you're a multi-family property manager or owner, and need unmatched restoration capability, Atlas National Renovations is here to serve you.

We specialize in cutting-edge, high-quality ways to achieve your renovation goals - for your tenants but also for your corporate leaders and management team. After all, a successful multi-family renovation benefits all parties.

We currently work with the top multi-family groups across our state. Unlike some multi-family renovation companies in Texas, our team understands the inner workings of the multi-family environment. Our customers appreciate our accommodations to their residents, maintenance team, leasing team, corporate leaders, and beyond. We're proud to say we know multi-family, inside and out, and have the credentials to back up those claims.

When crafting a multi-family restoration plan, we always consider your tenant's demographics, your building's curb appeal, property age, and energy efficiency. Whether you need to have significant updates applied to an older property or need a water damage inspection for a brand-new building, we can help.

Here is a quick glance at some of the multi-family renovations that our team handles:

  • Leak Detection and Water Intrusion Investigation
  • Exterior Sealants and Waterproofing
  • Large Interior and Exterior Paint Projects
  • Stucco Remediation and Exterior Facade Re-Clads
  • Full Property Exterior Repaints
  • Concrete and Flatwork
  • Corridor and Common Area Painting
  • Roof Replacement

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Discover the
Atlas Difference

Water damage restoration is a crucial, complex process that must be completed properly to save your business from serious damage. Choosing the right professional is equally important, especially when your customers' health is on the line. Whether you need large-scale commercial restoration or quick, effective water damage cleanup for your storefront business, know that we are only a phone call away. Contact our friendly team of experts to learn more about Atlas National Renovations and how we clean up your water damage mess better than the rest.

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Latest News in Allen, TX

Softball players reel in all-state honors

Softball players from Berkeley, Hanahan and Timberland high schools landed all-state honors by the S.C. Coaches Association of Women’s Sports. All three teams captured region titles this spring. As press time, the Stags held a 1-0 lead in a best-of-three series against Ashley Ridge in the Lower State championship series. The Lower State winner plays the winner of the Upper State series – Fort Mill or Byrnes – for the Class AAAAA title. That series is scheduled for June 1, 3 and 5. The Lower State winner...

Softball players from Berkeley, Hanahan and Timberland high schools landed all-state honors by the S.C. Coaches Association of Women’s Sports.

All three teams captured region titles this spring.

As press time, the Stags held a 1-0 lead in a best-of-three series against Ashley Ridge in the Lower State championship series.

The Lower State winner plays the winner of the Upper State series – Fort Mill or Byrnes – for the Class AAAAA title. That series is scheduled for June 1, 3 and 5. The Lower State winner hosts Game 1 and the Upper State winner hosts Game 2. Game 3 would be at a neutral site.

Berkeley’s Class AAAAA all-state selections are junior P/OF Gracie DeCuir, sophomore P/OF Abby Prince and senior IF Jersey Silver.

Hanahan’s picks in Class AAA are senior IF Brooke Patterson and sophomore IF Brooke Jones. The Hawkettes advanced to a postseason district championship game before ending the season there.

In Class AA, Timberland’s all-state selections are sophomore OF Emily Dawson, junior C Abbi Harrawood and senior IF Hayley Gaskins. The Wolves finished the season in the district tournament.

Berkeley 6, Ashley Ridge 2

Southpaw Abby Prince pitched a three-hitter and drove in two runs at the plate to power Berkeley to a 6-2 victory over visiting Ashley Ridge in the opening game of the Class AAAAA Lower State championship series in softball on May 24.

Prince fanned five batters and allowed one earned run while infielders Jersey Silver and Hayden Richberg each collected two hits and scored twice for Berkeley (28-3).

The Stags trailed 1-0 before scoring three runs in the bottom of the third inning.

Ashley Ridge plated an unearned run in the top of the sixth to pull within 3-2 but Berkeley broke it open in the bottom of the frame.

Silver and Prince knocked in runs with singles and Savannah Ballentine drew a walk with the bases loaded for the Stags.

Former Knight earns academic honor

Former Stratford High School baseball standout Dylan Stewart, now a freshman second baseman for the Charleston Southern Buccaneers, received all-academic honors by the Big South Conference as part of the conference’s annual baseball awards.

Stewart posted a 3.90 grade-point average while majoring in accounting. He saw action in 36 games, drawing 29 starts.

Stewart claimed Big South Freshman of the Week recognition following the Bucs’ early season series win over Longwood after belting out a pair of triples to help CSU secure the win over the Lancers.

He finished tied atop the conference leaderboard in triples with four on the season while hitting his first home run of the year against USC Upstate on April 17.

Stewart finished with a .253 batting average and 12 RBIs.

Several upcoming covid-19 testing and vaccination sites available in Lowcountry region

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCIV) — DHEC has announced more upcoming covid-19 clinics and testing opportunities set up for the coming days. Events are planned in Charleston, Berkeley, Dorchester, Colleton, Beaufort, Jasper, Hampton, Allendale, Bamberg, Orangeburg and Calhoun counties. UPCOMING SCHEDULE: Monday June 21, 9:30 a.m. – 3:30 p.m., Goose Creek Health Center, 106 Westview Dr., Goose Creek Monday June 21, 10:00 a.m. – 3:30 p.m., Calhoun County Health and Human, 2837 Old Belleville Road, St. Matthew...

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCIV) — DHEC has announced more upcoming covid-19 clinics and testing opportunities set up for the coming days.

Events are planned in Charleston, Berkeley, Dorchester, Colleton, Beaufort, Jasper, Hampton, Allendale, Bamberg, Orangeburg and Calhoun counties.

UPCOMING SCHEDULE:

Monday June 21, 9:30 a.m. – 3:30 p.m., Goose Creek Health Center, 106 Westview Dr., Goose Creek

Monday June 21, 10:00 a.m. – 3:30 p.m., Calhoun County Health and Human, 2837 Old Belleville Road, St. Matthews

Tuesday June 22, 10:00 a.m. – 3:30 p.m., Charleston First Assembly, 2957 Savannah Highway, Charleston

Tuesday June 22, 10:00 a.m. – 3:30 p.m., Hampton County Health Department, 531 West Carolina Avenue, Varnville

Wednesday June 23, 10:00 a.m. – 3:30 p.m., Bamberg County Health Department, 370 Log Branch Road, Bamberg

Wednesday June 23, 4 p.m. – 7 p.m., Brewlab, 2200 Heriot Street, Charleston

Thursday June 24, 10 a.m. – 3:30 p.m., Orangeburg County Health Department, 1550 Carolina Avenue, Orangeburg

Friday June 25, 9:30 a.m.- 3:30 p.m., Mt. Pleasant Health Clinic, 1189 Sweetgrass Basket Parkway- Suite 100, Mt. Pleasant

Friday June 25, 10:00 a.m.- 3:30 p.m., Bluffton Health Clinic, 4819 Bluffton Parkway- Suite 132, Bluffton, SC

Friday June 25, 4 p.m. – 7 p.m., Cooper River Brewing, 2201 Mechanic Street B, Charleston

Friday June 25, 3 p.m. – 6 p.m., Low Tide Brewing, 2863 Maybank Highway, Johns Island

Community Partner Vaccine Clinics

Some non-DHEC vaccine providers may ask for your insurance information or an identification card, but you are not required to provide these in order to receive your vaccine and cannot be turned away. To make your appointment with a non-DHEC clinic, register online with the provider or call the provider directly.

Monday, June 21, 8:30 a.m. – 4 p.m., Family Health Centers, Inc., Senior Recreation and Leisure Center, 220 Park Street, Neeses

Monday, June 21, 8:30 a.m. – 4 p.m., Family Health Centers, Inc., New Mt. Zion Baptist Church, 1785 Amelia Street, Orangeburg

Tuesday, June 22, 8:30 a.m. – 4 p.m., Family Health Centers, Inc., Orangeburg City Gym, 410 Broughton Street, Orangeburg

Tuesday, June 22, 8:30 a.m. – 4 p.m., Family Health Centers, Inc., Mt. Olive Baptist Church, 678 Olive Drive, Cordova

Wednesday, June 23, 8:30 a.m. – 4 p.m., Family Health Centers, Inc., Denmark Train Depot, 12 Baruch Street, Denmark

Wednesday, June 23, 8:30 a.m. – 4 p.m., Family Health Centers, Inc., Holly Hill Depot, 8603 Old State Road, Holly Hill

Thursday, June 24, 8:30 a.m. – 4 p.m., Family Health Centers, Inc., Orangeburg County Fairgrounds, 350 Magnolia Street, Orangeburg

Thursday, June 24, 8:30 a.m. – 4 p.m., Family Health Centers, Inc., Holly Hill Depot, 8603 Old State Road, Holly Hill

Friday, June 25, 8:30 a.m. – 4 p.m., Family Health Centers, Inc., Saint Mark United Methodist Church, 8502 North Road, North

Friday, June 25, 8:30 a.m. – 4 p.m., Family Health Centers, Inc., Union Baptist Church, 16494 Ehrhardt Road, Bamberg

Saturday, June 26, 8:30 a.m. – 1 p.m., Family Health Centers, Inc., Ness Sports Complex, 381 Rhoad Park Street, Bamberg

Free COVID-19 Testing

DHEC-sponsored testing is free and pain-free (oral or nasal swab). Find a free DHEC testing location near you at: scdhec.gov/gettested. Information for non-DHEC testing opportunities from community partners is available here: scdhec.gov/covid19testing.

There continues to be a high rate of COVID-19 disease transmission in communities across our state, according to DHEC. The CDC currently recommends these individuals to get tested for COVID-19.

People who have symptoms of COVID-19, regardless of vaccination status or prior infection.

Most people who have had close contact (within 6 feet for a total of 15 minutes or more over a 24-hour period) with someone with confirmed COVID-19.

oFully vaccinated people with no COVID-19 symptoms do not need to be tested following an exposure to someone with COVID-19.

oPeople who have tested positive for COVID-19 within the past 3 months and recovered do not need to get tested following an exposure as long as they do not develop new symptoms.

People who have taken part in activities that put them at higher risk for COVID-19, such as travel, attending large social or mass gatherings, or being in crowded or poorly ventilated indoor settings.

People who have been asked or referred to get tested by their healthcare provider.

Most current vaccine clinic information: scdhec.gov/vaxlocator

Most current testing site information: scdhec.gov/findatest

The Moderna and Janssen (Johnson & Johnson) vaccines are currently available for people 18 and older, and the Pfizer vaccine is for ages 12 and up.

COVID-19 vaccinations are free. You won't pay deductibles, co-insurance, or co-payments. DHEC says walk-ins are welcome at vaccine events. Appointments can also be made by calling 866-365-8110.

Even as threat of COVID-19 lingers, SC residents look to a more relaxed summer

Tired of COVID-19 dampening life in the 55-and-older community where he lives, Roger Dolida took to his golf cart to find out for himself whether the neighborhood had reached herd immunity. Over three weeks, he surveyed roughly 400 of his neighbors, asking them simply whether they were fully vaccinated against the virus. “I’d catch them washing their car, taking their dog for a walk,” he said. Dolida, who got his first dose in February, said he was careful not to pry about people’s reasons, and said ever...

Tired of COVID-19 dampening life in the 55-and-older community where he lives, Roger Dolida took to his golf cart to find out for himself whether the neighborhood had reached herd immunity. Over three weeks, he surveyed roughly 400 of his neighbors, asking them simply whether they were fully vaccinated against the virus.

“I’d catch them washing their car, taking their dog for a walk,” he said.

Dolida, who got his first dose in February, said he was careful not to pry about people’s reasons, and said everyone in the tight-knit community offered up their status willingly. He announced the results of his survey in a neighborhood Facebook group: 91 percent of residents are vaccinated. Cresswind loosened its restrictions not long after.

So, on an 89-degree day at the community in Summerville, people were floating in the community pool and sitting around card tables, mask-less, to enjoy a game of Hand and Foot.

The residents of Cresswind aren’t the only South Carolinians looking forward to a more relaxed summer than last.

People have good reason to be optimistic. Reports of deaths from COVID-19 have fallen to the lowest points since last spring. About 2,400 cases of the disease were confirmed in the state the week of May 15, compared to a devastatingly high 40,300 one January week. And, in perhaps its biggest shift yet, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said May 13 that fully vaccinated people can drop their masks almost entirely.

Yet the threat of COVID-19 lingers. Across South Carolina, just 37 percent of residents are fully vaccinated, leaving more than half of the state just as vulnerable as ever to infection.

Masking rules around the state are still varied. And though Gov. Henry McMaster ordered an end to mask mandates May 11, Richland County Council decided to keep its rules in place through at least the first week of June.

McMaster’s order extended to schools, where parents can choose to opt their children out of wearing masks. Dr. Allison Eckard, director of the division of pediatric infectious diseases at the Medical University of South Carolina, said she and her colleagues are “alarmed” by the number of families who have opted out of the requirements in the last weeks of school.

“As summer begins, many of our children will be engaged in summer camps, group events and other high-risk activities,” Eckard said during a May 24 press conference. “We therefore urge parents and event organizers to continue to take appropriate steps to reduce the spread of COVID-19.”

Eckard remains concerned about the threat of MIS-C, an inflammatory disease that can stem from COVID-19 in children. The MUSC Shawn Jenkins Children’s Hospital has seen a slight uptick in the number of cases of the syndrome recently. Children under the age of 12 are the only group not currently eligible for a COVID-19 vaccine.

Bainie Brunson, a James Island resident and mother of three girls ages 9, 6 and 2, had to cut her own working hours in half when her daughters needed to switch to virtual learning last year.

Brunson said she hated to send them back to in-person schooling before vaccines were widely available, and she was frustrated that some parents opted their children out of masks following the governor’s order. One of Brunson’s daughters has asthma, and the family has been religiously avoiding unnecessary risks. That will continue this summer, even as many adults change their behavior.

“I’m gonna keep them as close as I possibly can,” she said.

Brunson said the family has a pool, and she is considering activities her children can safely do at a distance, like tennis and horseback riding.

Dr. Brannon Traxler, director of public health for DHEC, said she couldn’t offer blanket advice to families with young children. Each family should judge the risks of traveling or attending large gatherings individually, she said, keeping in mind that masks are proven to protect children as young as 2 years old.

Travel isn’t a possibility at all for some South Carolina families. Besides her husband and two adult daughters, Michelle Matters’ family lives in Canada. Matters’ husband took a job at Michelin in 1998. The family now lives in Greenville, though they have made a trip back to their vacation home on Prince Edward Island every year until 2020, when restrictions on international travel began.

Matters said she and her family’s motivation for getting vaccinated was the hope it would be a ticket to safely travel back to Canada. But the border between Canada and the United States remains closed to non-essential travel, even to dual citizens like Matters and her husband.

“Our hearts would love to be seeing family because it’s been two years,” Matters said.

Instead, the family is considering a shorter road trip to North Carolina or Tennessee.

Prone to adventure and eager to break out of the COVID-19 slog, Kristin Miller Burrell and her family went on a wilderness competition show called “Survivalists,” which filmed in November in Moab, Utah, and airs in early July.

The whole family, who live in Greenville, was also eager to get vaccines, so much so that they drove to Atlanta in February to try to take part in a Moderna trial for adolescents. But on the day they got to Atlanta, the trial froze. They waited five hours before turning back.

Looking to this summer, Burrell said she and her husband had hoped they could travel internationally.

“We always want to expose our kids to the rest of the world,” Burrell said. “This summer, that’s not going to happen, because we couldn’t really plan anything due to the pandemic.”

They opted instead to rent a beach house, and are allowing each of their teenage daughters to invite friends. She remains worried about the variants of the virus.

Meanwhile, some summer programs have had to re-configure to accommodate the partial lifting of restrictions.

Camps at the Children’s Museum of the Lowcountry always sell out, and this year was no different. The waitlist is almost as long as there are spaces at its camps, said Nichole Myles, executive director of the museum.

“Families know that we are fully invested in their children,” Myles said.

But it has been a difficult year for the museum. The downtown attraction lost 57 percent of its operating budget and 40 percent of its staff. Because of space constraints, the museum is cutting back its hours and only offering camps during the week, while general admission is open on the weekends. Everyone will still have to wear masks, keeping to CDC guidance which recommends that schools and other places where kids gather indoors continue to implement universal masking, Myles said.

Myles said not all parents have taken to the continued masking requirement happily; the museum gets its fair share of angry emails, she said. But she added the museum has remained committed to giving kids early childhood learning experiences. Last summer, 450 children attended the summer camps, without a single incident, a track record Myles is proud of.

“We don’t have to give up everything,” she said. “Camp is still an amazing experience for young children.”

For some families, there is no need to limit themselves at all. Simpsonville residents Karen Callis, her husband and 16-year-old son are renting an RV in early June and taking U.S. Route 66, planning to hit national parks, major cities and see the West. Callis’ husband has been considering the trip ever since their son’s childhood obsession with the movie “Cars.” They had to postpone the plans last year due to COVID-19.

“We’re trying to be spontaneous as much as we can,” Callis said.

Settlement on the horizon for challenges to Long Savannah's wetland permits in Charleston

Administrative challenges to the sprawling Long Savannah development have been dropped, and the builders and three environmental groups who opposed them seem to be headed toward a resolution. Long Savannah is a yearslong effort to place a mix of homes, businesses and conserved land at the edge of the city of Charleston in West Ashley. It comprises 3,000 acres with rights to construct 4,500 homes, and was ...

Administrative challenges to the sprawling Long Savannah development have been dropped, and the builders and three environmental groups who opposed them seem to be headed toward a resolution.

Long Savannah is a yearslong effort to place a mix of homes, businesses and conserved land at the edge of the city of Charleston in West Ashley. It comprises 3,000 acres with rights to construct 4,500 homes, and was originally held up as a “green” development, in part because roughly half the acreage is parkland.

Last year, state regulators at the S.C. Department of Health and Environmental Control approved a permit that would have let developers destroy 200 acres of wetlands in the process. That was the permit that three groups, represented by two environmental law firms, had challenged.

The groups said then that developers needed to make more of an effort to avoid these sensitive areas, which provide valuable wildlife habitat and help soak up floodwaters. Opponents also pointed out the flooding problems that already exist in the area, which is drained by narrow Church Creek.

But now, challenges to the permits in the state’s Administrative Law Court, which reviews the decisions of state agencies, have been withdrawn, and a settlement is under discussion, said Mary Shahid, an attorney for the developers.

Early details were not available.

“We’re working with everybody on a settlement, but it’s not finalized yet, and we want to present it as a group, not individually,” Shahid said.

Lorraine Chow, a spokeswoman for the South Carolina Environmental Law Project, said in an email, “the parties are continuing to work towards a resolution.” SCELP is representing two of the challengers, Sierra Club and the South Carolina Wildlife Federation.

Catherine Wannamaker, an attorney with the Southern Environmental Law Center, said it’s likely the settlement would end not only challenges to state-approved permits, but also to a still-pending permit application to the Army Corps of Engineers. The Corps manages a federal wetland protection program. SELC is representing Charleston Waterkeeper, the last group challenging the development.

It’s unclear exactly when a final agreement will be struck, but the case had been scheduled for trial in the ALC next week, before it was withdrawn.

Challenges ahead for Harry Lightsey, SC's commerce secretary nominee

COLUMBIA — Gov. Henry McMaster’s pick to become the state’s next commerce secretary would lead an agency grappling with issues such as broadband-related disparities in economic development while facing increasing scrutiny over how it spends tax dollars. At a June 17 news conference at the Statehouse, McMaster introduced former telecom executive Harry Lightsey III as his nominee for the cabinet position responsible for attracting jobs and industry to the Palmetto State. Lightsey, whose nomination still needs to...

COLUMBIA — Gov. Henry McMaster’s pick to become the state’s next commerce secretary would lead an agency grappling with issues such as broadband-related disparities in economic development while facing increasing scrutiny over how it spends tax dollars.

At a June 17 news conference at the Statehouse, McMaster introduced former telecom executive Harry Lightsey III as his nominee for the cabinet position responsible for attracting jobs and industry to the Palmetto State.

Lightsey, whose nomination still needs to be confirmed by the Senate, would succeed Bobby Hitt, the longest-serving head of the S.C. Commerce Department who’s helped recruit $43 billion in business investment and 150,000 jobs during his decade-long tenure.

The governor touted Lightsey as the right pick to continue building on Hitt’s legacy, noting his extensive experience in the state, which includes stints as South Carolina president at BellSouth Telecommunications and Southeast president of AT&T. Most recently, he was a principal with Washington, D.C., business consulting group Hawksbill Advisers.

“Harry Lightsey has been a fixture in the South Carolina’s business community for many years, and I am confident that as our next secretary of commerce, he will keep South Carolina winning,” McMaster said.

In his opening remarks, Lightsey alluded to the long-running debate over transparency at the agency, casting it as a balance between public accountability and maintaining the state’s competitive edge.

“We must maintain the public’s trust in how their tax dollars and our state assets are used to incentivize economic development and we must do so without losing our state’s competitive position,” Harry M. Lightsey III said.

Some of the legislators who will be voting on Lightsey’s confirmation, especially state Sens. Dick Harpootlian, D-Columbia, and Wes Climer, R-Rock Hill, have pressed the agency to reveal more details about the deals they strike with companies to incentivize them to come to South Carolina and how well the companies live up to their commitments.

Asked whether he believed the agency should be more forthcoming about the incentive deals, Lightsey noted he is new to the job.

“You have my commitment to be as transparent as I can without sacrificing the definitive interests of the state and its citizens,” Lightsey said.

With a telecommunications background, Lightsey could also be well-positioned to build upon one of Hitt’s priorities by expanding high-speed internet service to rural areas. South Carolina ranks 31st nationally for access to broadband, according to federal data, and about half a million residents do not have access to high-speed, affordable internet. Hitt has said the lack of broadband access is one of the biggest hindrances to economic development in rural areas.

“I can tell you that getting broadband infrastructure into our state and throughout the rural areas of the state should be a top priority for all of us as we go forward, and I look forward to exploring the opportunities to do that with all of the stakeholders,” Lightsey said.

In addition to his work in telecommunications, Lightsey was a former member of the board of directors for the Federal Reserve Bank in Richmond, Va., and was director of emerging technologies policy for General Motors. Lightsey’s father, Harry Lightsey Jr., was the former president of the College of Charleston, where the younger Lightsey has served as a trustee.

McMaster said Hitt’s “imprint on our state’s economy and progress has been immeasurable,” adding the former newspaper editor and BMW executive who will be retiring this fall has “solidified Team South Carolina’s global brand for automotive, aerospace and tire manufacturing and their international exports to name a few.”

Under Hitt’s leadership, Commerce has landed major investments from some of South Carolina’s best-known industries, including tiremakers Michelin and Bridgestone, commercial vehicle manufacturer Mercedes-Benz Vans, appliance industry leader Samsung and the $1.2 billion Volvo Cars campus in Berkeley County.

South Carolina’s automotive sector has grown to a $27 billion-a-year industry during Hitt’s tenure, and aerospace firms now contribute $28 billion annually to the state’s economy.

Hitt said he has known Lightsey for several decades and would remain available to help him as he takes on the new job at no expense to the state.

“This is not easy work, it’s not traditional work, but it’s work I know that Harry will fit into very well,” Hitt said.

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