Princeton

Fire Damage
Restoration in Princeton, TX

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Elite Level Fire Damage Restoration in Princeton, TX

Fire damage to your home is one of the most traumatizing, frightening tragedies a person can experience. This is especially true in apartment buildings and multifamily homes, where dozens if not hundreds of families are affected by fire and smoke damage. When a fire rips through an apartment building, the property damage can be catastrophic. But the damage caused by fires doesn't end once the flames have been extinguished. Victims are left wondering what happens next now that their belongings are destroyed. When will they have a roof over their again?

In these circumstances, prompt, purpose-driven fire damage restoration is key to reducing victims' financial and emotional strain.

The National Fire Protection Association states that a structure fire is reported every 65 seconds. When the fire alarm sounds, emergency responders answer the call for help with decisive action. But once the smoke clears, Atlas National Renovations' team of fire restoration experts step in to give hope to property managers, apartment tenants, and commercial property owners.

With decades of combined experience in disaster recovery, ANR understands the complexities associated with commercial and apartment building fires. We have helped the top multifamily groups in Texas recover their tenants' homes and belongings with care and compassion. If you're a property manager and you're still reeling from a fire disaster, know that we're here to help you too.

At Atlas National Renovations, our expert project managers and technicians play key roles in complicated fire restoration projects. We specialize in restoring Class A, B, and C properties like apartment complexes, high-rise buildings, multifamily buildings, mixed-use developments, large commercial properties, and more.

Service Areas

If you're looking for a top-tier fire damage restoration company in Princeton, look no further than ANR. We're the top pick when it comes to large, detailed fire restoration projects because we:

  • Are a Trusted Partner in Restoration and Disaster Recovery
  • Adhere to OSHA Standards and State & Federal Regulations
  • Use the Latest Equipment & Remediation Techniques
  • Offer Innovative Solutions to Detailed Problems
  • Provide Seasoned Project Managers for Each Fire Restoration Project
  • Give Clients Clear and Consistent Communication
  • Work with Insurance Companies
  • Have a Knowledgeable & Courteous Leadership Team

Fire Damage Restoration for Apartment Buildings in Princeton, TX

Owners and managers of apartment complexes know that the safety of their tenants is a major responsibility. Unfortunately, nobody can completely control when apartment fires occur. Fires in apartments and multifamily buildings may start small, but they spread quickly, often destroying several living spaces. These frightening fires destroy prized heirlooms, important documents, and can even be fatal. However, the work is only beginning once the fire is put out and lives are saved.

In the aftermath of a disaster, figuring out the next steps is hard. During this difficult time, it's important to be prepared. As a property manager or owner, having a fire damage restoration company on your checklist of resources is crucial.

Unlike residential fires, apartment and multifamily building fires add several more layers of complexity and stress. In these situations, you deserve a restoration partner that you can trust without question, and that company is Atlas National Renovations.

Disaster Recovery Princeton, TX

With years of experience guiding our technicians and project managers, the ANS team responds quickly to your fire damage emergency. Using advanced protocols and state-of-the-art restoration equipment, we get to work quickly to repair and restore your commercial property to its pre-loss condition. While restoring your property, we always keep your tenant's care and comfort in mind.

Our fire restoration services in Princeton are comprehensive and include the following:

  • Rapid Mobilization and Response
  • Overall Catastrophe Management
  • Emergency Board-Up Services
  • Debris Removal and Disposal
  • Apartment Content Inventory and Cleaning
  • Soot and Smoke Removal Services
  • Water Extraction
  • Deodorization
  • HVAC Cleaning and Decontamination
  • Shoring Installment to Secure Buildings
  • Interior & Exterior Renovations

Our Fire Damage Restoration Process

It's imperative to have someone with knowledge and experience on your side during a fire crisis.

When you call ANS, our fire restoration experts can help walk you through the steps you need to take once a fire occurs. This allows us to quickly gain control of the restoration project on your behalf. Once we have inspected your property, we'll provide a detailed report and scope of work for your fire damage restoration project.

ANS repairs all property damage caused by soot, smoke, and fire. Our IICRC-certified fire restoration teams construct the best plan to quickly get your building back to its pre-loss condition.

 Renovations Princeton, TX

Because every property is different, each fire restoration project for apartment buildings is too. However, every fire disaster will have a similar process and will often include:

Contact ANS

Your fire restoration process begins when you call our headquarters. Our specialist will ask you a series of questions about the fire event that occurred. That way, we can arrive on-site with the proper resources and equipment.

Fire Damage Assessment
and Inspection

Our fire damage restoration team will carefully inspect the entirety of your apartment complex, from building to building and room to room. We do so to determine the extent of your apartment's fire, smoke, and soot damage. This step is crucial to developing a comprehensive restoration plan.

Board-Up Services

First responders like firefighters must break windows and cut holes in roofs to slow fire growth and save lives. Once the fire is out, our team can get to work, boarding up holes and constructing temporary fencing around the property.

Water Removal

If there is water damage associated with your apartment fire, we'll remove most of the water immediately. From there, we use air movers and dehumidifiers to help complete the drying process.

Smoke and Soot Removal

Within minutes of a fire, walls, electronics, and other surfaces are covered in soot. Smoke and ash continue to cause damage to every inch of your apartment building. That's why ANS uses specialized equipment to remediate smoke damage and remove odors. This process is often labor-intensive and can take time, especially for large fire damage restoration needs.

Cleaning and Sanitizing

Using a variety of restoration and cleaning techniques, our team will help clean restorable items and sanitize units for safety.

Restoration

Getting your apartment buildings to their pre-fire conditions is our ultimate goal. Depending on the size and scope of the fire restoration job, minor repairs like painting, drywall replacement, and new carpet installation might be needed. You might also need major structural renovations like re-siding, re-roofing, new window installation, floor replacement, and more.

Tips for Preventing Apartment Fires

If you're a property manager or own multifamily residential buildings, the thought of an apartment fire is terrifying. What starts as a small fire can quickly turn into a catastrophic event, with your entire complex up in flames. However, one of the best ways of preventing these fires is to know more about them.

Share these tips with tenants to help prevent deadly apartment fires:

Turn Off Heat Sources

Turn Off Heat Sources

Data shows that a large number of apartment fires begin with cooking. Often, these fires are caused by the ignition of common items like rags, curtains, wallpapers, and bags. Encourage tenants to keep their kitchens and cooking areas clear of combustibles. Never leave a stove unattended for long, and don't leave burners on by themselves. Unintentional mishaps like leaving heat sources on are common causes of fires that can be prevented with a little forethought.

Electrical Safety

Electrical Safety

Like heat sources, electrical malfunctions are also common causes of fires in apartment complexes. It's hard to prevent all electrical malfunctions, but you can tell tenants to avoid bad habits. Tips include never using extension cords as permanent solutions and never using a cable if the third prong is missing.

Appliance Safety

Appliance Safety

Appliances are a part of everyone's lives. They're also standard equipment in most apartment units. But if tenants don't take proper precautions, these useful tools can spark deadly fires.

Tips for Preventing Apartment Fires

No matter how large or small, fires are nightmare scenarios for entrepreneurs with commercial properties. Fire damage can completely ruin storefronts and offices, leaving charred remains and burned-up files before firefighters arrive. To make matters worse, soot and smoke damage ruin your businesses' furniture, HVAC system, carpet, walls, and windows.

To eliminate health hazards and restore your business to its pre-fire condition, you need to bring in a team of professionals with years of experience in fire damage remediation. At ANR, we use commercial-grade equipment and cutting-edge tools to clean up the aftermath of your fire and rebuild your property. That way, you can get back to running your business and providing for your family.

 Apartment Renovations Princeton, TX

Share these tips with tenants to help prevent deadly apartment fires:

Remove Smoke and Fire Damage

 Home Renovations Princeton, TX

One of the most common causes of large commercial loss stems from smoke and fire damage. Of course, these disasters cause injuries and fatalities. But they also generate tremendous amounts of damage, rot, mold, and harm to structures. Not to mention the devastation that fire damage has to the appearance and livability of the facility. Fire damage restoration companies restore - and also prevent - the root cause of the fire. Electrical outlets, wires, and other fire-prone items will all be addressed to prevent a subsequent disaster.

Highly Skilled

 Home Restorations Princeton, TX

The best fire damage restoration professionals are highly-trained, exceptionally skilled, and properly equipped to deal with every aspect of a commercial fire. From handling major renovations to taking care of the lingering effects of smoke damage, pro fire restoration companies take care of it for you. Hiring ANR means you'll be working with technicians who have the knowledge, tools, and materials to get the job done right the first time.

Insurance Claims

 Multifamily Home Renovations Princeton, TX

When you start the claim process with your businesses' insurance company, they'll ask whether you've hired a fire damage restoration company. That's because companies like Atlas prevent further damage from occurring and calculate an estimate of your total loss. You can submit this estimate to your insurance company, which may then provide you with resources to complete your company's disaster recovery mt-md-1

Discover the
Atlas Difference

Fire damage restoration is a crucial, complex process that professionals must perform. With decades of expertise, unmatched restoration quality, and the scalability for any job, Atlas National Renovations is well-equipped to be your single source for commercial fire damage restoration in Princeton, TX. We are specially equipped to make difficult restoration projects easy for owners.

When a fire disaster strikes, you need a timely response from a trustworthy team of experts. Don't settle for a mediocre fire restoration partner. Choose ANR to get the job done right the first time. Contact our office today to learn more about our fire restoration services in the Dallas-Fort Worth metroplex.

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NJ.com girls lacrosse Top 20, June 8: State tourney ushers in changes

It’s almost become tradition at this point. Even with a new format for the state tournament this season, and as much regular season parity as there’s been in girls lacrosse in years, the favorites still emerged unscathed through the first week of the state tournament. The semifinals in all 10 brackets are set and the top four seeds litter the remaining contests. That doesn’t mean the rankings remained stagnant. The N.J. High School Sports newsletter arrives May 31. Sign up now and be among the fir...

It’s almost become tradition at this point.

Even with a new format for the state tournament this season, and as much regular season parity as there’s been in girls lacrosse in years, the favorites still emerged unscathed through the first week of the state tournament.

The semifinals in all 10 brackets are set and the top four seeds litter the remaining contests. That doesn’t mean the rankings remained stagnant.

The N.J. High School Sports newsletter arrives May 31. Sign up now and be among the first to get all the boys and girls sports you care about, straight to your inbox each weekday.

This week still welcomes a new teams into the midst, and saw some notable shuffles as some early season darlings managed to come through on that perceived promise this past week. And things will certainly pick up this upcoming week with the group finals set for the weekend at Montgomery and Middletown South.

With plenty of change this week, here’s the new Top 20:

1-Oak Knoll (17-1)

Last Week: No. 1

There’s little to say about Oak Knoll that hasn’t already been said so far this year. The Royals got a bit of a scare when Montclair battled in a 17-13 decision, with that four-goal game the closest contest Oak Knoll played in nearly a month. If a four-goal win gave anyone any pause, a 19-8 win over Camden Catholic to start the state tournament certainly changed that. If anything, those two games just reinforced how dominant Oak Knoll has been for most of this season.

2-Summit (16-2)

Last Week: No. 2

Oak Knoll is still the only team to score 10 goals against Summit this season. Since the Union County Tournament final loss, Summit has allowed a total of 16 goals in four games, and has kept its first two state tournament opponents to a combined five goals.

3-Chatham (17-1)

Last Week: No. 3

Chatham has had no trouble through the first two games of the state tournament. The vaunted Cougars defense allowed four total goals in those two games, while winning both by well over 10 goals, and looks on a collision course with a third straight contest with Mendham. Chatham would likely love nothing more than to sweep its rival in those three contests, with the latter two leading directly to hardware.

4-Ridgewood (15-2)

Last Week: No. 4

Ridgewood has won seven straight games heading into the semifinals, and hasn’t allowed more than six goals during that stretch. That dominant performance, recently highlighted by an 18-3 win over Hillsborough in the quarterfinals, has Ridgewood looking like its usual dominant self.

5-Haddonfield (15-1)

Last Week: No. 5

Haddonfield’s winning streak is to 12 games after the Bulldogs rolled to state tournament wins this week over Collingswood, 20-0, and Haddon Township, 17-2. Haddonfield will host Bernards in the South Jersey, Group 1 semifinals this week and remains the heavy favorite to win a Group 1 title this weekend.

6-Moorestown (13-2)

Last Week: No. 6

Moorestown opened the state tournament with a 19-0 win over Northern Burlington in the South Jersey, Group 3 quarterfinals this week. The Quakers, gunning for a 10th straight sectional title, will face Ocean City in the sectional semifinals on Tuesday.

7-Rumson-Fair Haven (17-2)

Last Week: No. 7

After winning its eighth straight Shore Conference Tournament title, Rumson-Fair Haven began its trek for its first Group 2 title since 2016 with a 16-1 win over Seneca in the quarterfinals of the South Jersey, Group 2 over the weekend. Rumson will host Hopewell Valley on Tuesday in the semifinals.

8-Trinity Hall (17-1)

Last Week: No. 8

Trinity Hall is into the Non-Public B semifinals and eyeing its first-ever trip to a state title game after convincing state tournament wins this week over Ranney, 16-0, and Holy Spirit, 19-3. The Monarchs, in just their fifth varsity season, will host Morristown-Beard in the Non-Public B semifinals on Thursday.

9-Lenape (13-2)

Last Week: No. 9

Lenape cruised to opening round state tournament wins this week in South Jersey, Group 4, collecting victories over Howell, 19-0, and Kingsway, 20-8. The competition in that bracket will ramp up this week, beginning with the semifinals on Tuesday and a trip for the No. 3-seed Indians to No. 2-seed Rancocas Valley.

10-Cherokee (17-1)

Last Week: No. 10

Cherokee rebounded from its loss to Lenape in the regular season finale last week with a pair of dominant wins as the No. 1-seed in South Jersey, Group 4. Cherokee beat Williamstown, 16-2, and Egg Harbor, 19-7, to reach the sectional semifinals where it will host No. 4-seed Princeton on Tuesday.

11-Mount St. Mary (16-2)

Last Week: No. 11

Mount St. Mary kept its season alive in dramatic fashion on Monday, knocking off Pingry — the team that ended its season in both 2018 and 2019 — to reach the Non-Public A semifinals as the No. 4-seed. Mount St. Mary has won 13 straight games since a lopsided loss to Rumson-Fair Haven on April 29 and will challenge No. 1-ranked Oak Knoll in the semifinals on Thursday.

12-Westfield (12-6)

Last Week: No. 14

Westfield certainly seems determined. The Blue Devils didn’t let last week’s rain deter it, waiting out the weather so they wouldn’t have to wait another day to eliminate Hunterdon Central and march closer to a sectional title. It would be the second sectional title for Westfield in the last three seasons.

13-Morristown (12-7)

Last Week: No. 15

Morristown faced a gauntlet to end the regular season, and that arduous journey simply makes the Colonials look battle-tested a week into the state tournament. Morristown has picked up two of its most impressive wins the last couple weeks, slowing down a scorching-hot Ramapo team with a six-goal win, and then blowing past an underrated Ridge team by a 21-4 score in the quarterfinals this past week.

14-Allentown (15-0)

Last Week: No. 16

The last remaining unbeaten team in New Jersey, Allentown is into the South Jersey, Group 2 semifinals following state tournament victories over Timber Creek, 15-1, and Robbinsville, 18-8, this week. The Redbirds’ biggest challenge could arrive on Tuesday, however, as a battle-tested Manasquan team whose only losses have come against Top 10-ranked teams will head to Mercer County in the sectional semifinals.

15-Immaculate Heart (9-8)

Last Week: No. 17

Defense has long been IHA’s calling card, so it’s no shock that the Blue Eagles shut out their first state tournament opponent in a 17-0 win in the Non-Public A quarterfinals. IHA was an overtime goal away from reaching the Group 3 final in 2019, and now its two wins away from getting to the first Non-Public A final.

16-West Essex (18-1)

Last Week: No. 18

West Essex has been on a roll, winning its last eight games with a five-goal victory in the Essex County Tournament final the closest game during that stretch. The Knights have been dominant so far in the state tournament, beating Pascack Valley and Vernon by a combined 31-5 score.

17-Montclair (7-10)

Last Week: Not Ranked

Montclair doesn’t have the prettiest record, but it’s proven all season it has the talent to compete with the best teams in the state. The problem all year has been winning tight games with seven of Montclair’s loss coming by a single goal. Even a loss to Oak Knoll was encouraging, with the 17-13 score one of the tightest games Oak Knoll has played in the last month. Even better, Montclair finally showed it can come out on top against a tough opponent in a tight game, when it knocked out Bridgewater-Raritan in a 15-14 game in the quarterfinals.

18-Bridgewater-Raritan (12-4)

Last Week: No. 12

Bridgewater-Raritan’s season ended at the hands of Montclair in the North Jersey, Group 4 quarterfinals on Saturday, 15-14. A young and relatively inexperienced team when the season began, the Panthers proved to be among the top teams in Somerset County this year in a 12-win campaign. Kelly MacKinney finished as Bridgewater-Raritan’s leading scorer with 55 goals.

19-Pingry (10-6)

Last Week: No. 13

Pingry’s season ended in the Non-Public A quarterfinals, falling to Mount St. Mary in a down-to-the-wire loss on the road, 9-8. Expectations were relatively low for Pingry in March, but Carter Abbott’s team proved to be among the state’s best and turned in an impressive resume in 2021, stamped by a win over South Jersey powerhouse Haddonfield on the road.

20-Notre Dame (11-3)

Last Week: No. 19

Notre Dame, the No. 2-seed, advanced into the Non-Public A semifinals with an 11-6 win over No. 7-seed Red Bank Catholic in the quarterfinals on Monday. The Irish will enjoy home field advantage at least one more time as the winner of Immaculate Heart and Kent Place visits Lawrenceville with a trip to the Non-Public A title game on the line.

The NJ High School Sports newsletter arrives May 31. Be among the first to get all the boys and girls sports you care about, straight to your inbox each weekday. To add your name, click here.

Brian Deakyne and Evan Slavit cover girls lacrosse and may be reached at bdeakyne@njadvancemedia.com and eslavit@njadvancemedia.com. Follow them on Twitter @BrianDeakyne and @EvanSlavitHS.

Thank you for relying on us to provide the journalism you can trust. Please consider supporting NJ.com with a subscription.

Are You Ready For This? Here's How We Should All Celebrate National New Jersey Day!

I am feeling my New Jersey pride right about now! New Jersey was just named as the best state...yes, #1...to live in throughout the entire country! WOW....I know! Listen to Nicole Murray middays on 94.3 The Point and download our free 94.3 The Point app. Plus, Lou Russo just recently revealed that ...

I am feeling my New Jersey pride right about now!

New Jersey was just named as the best state...yes, #1...to live in throughout the entire country! WOW....I know!

Listen to Nicole Murray middays on 94.3 The Point and download our free 94.3 The Point app.

Plus, Lou Russo just recently revealed that National New Jersey day is 10000% a real thing and it is coming up on July 27th.

So I think...as fellow New Jerseyans...we deserve a celebration.

But the celebration needs to honor the New Jersey culture and all of its glory.

So here is how we all should celebrate...are you ready for this??

How True New Jerseyans Should Celebrate National New Jersey Day

It will be a big day...so let's celebrate big.

Piggy backing off the idea that New Jerseyans love to argue...arguing on the roads takes on a whole new artform because driving in NJ can be chaos.

So throw your hands up at someone who cuts you off and give a crappy driver the bird...ya know, just to get into the spirit.

Don't get me wrong..amusement parks are nice but if you are looking for a big thrill, Six Flags is where it is at.

It is such a New Jersey thing to go and spend the day here with friends.

It is located right in Jackson and has roller coasters, games, a water park and in my book is a New Jersey staple by far.

Jersey Pizza...DUH!

Anyone who moves out of state tells me straight that there is nothing like New Jersey pizza so this should be your lunch, dinner and midnight snack.

Take it up a notch by splurging on a $7.00 pizza slice on the boardwalk.

It has the same effect as eating ice cream out of the carton versus getting ice cream from the ice cream man...its just not the same when its NOT from the boardwalk.

10 Things You Probably Don't Know About New Jersey

10 NEW JERSEY STORES YOUR PARENTS SHOPPED AT BUT ARE NOW GONE

Steinbach was a department store chain based in Asbury Park with locations throughout the northeast. Steinbach was originally founded in 1870 by the Steinbach brothers, John, Henry, and Jacob in Long Branch. The brothers expanded to the Asbury location four years later. In early years, Steinbach's was considered to be the "world's largest department store." After decades of success, the chain closed in 1999.

Bamberger's was a department store chain with locations primarily in New Jersey and headquartered in Newark. In the 60s and 70s Bamberger's expanded rapidly throughout New Jersey and into the Philly area. As tje north Jersey population grew, Bamberger's lauched 'suburban branches' of L. Bamberger & Co. in downtown locations in Morristown, Plainfield, and Princeton. Other popular locations include East Brunswick, Garden State Plaza, Monmouth Mall, Nanuet Mall, Ocean County Mall, and Menlo Park Mall. In 1970, the East Brunswick location became an anchor store for the Brunswick Square Mall. On October 5, 1986, the Bamberger's stores adopted the name Macy's New Jersey, and in 1988 Macy's New Jersey was consolidated with sister division Macy's New York to form Macy's Northeast.

"Nobody beats The Wiz!" The Wiz was a chain of electronic stores in the northeast located primarily in New York, Pennsylvania and New Jersey. In 1998 the chain filed for bankruptcy and was purchased by Cablevision for $80 million. The last Wiz closed in 2003.

Rickel also known as Rickel Brothers in its early years, Rickel Supermarts in the '60s, and Rickel Home Centers in later years was a chain of home-improvement centers based in north Jersey. The company’s first store opened in 1953 and for three decades Rickel the go-to for hardware, plumbing, heating and electrical. At its peak Rickel operated over 90 stores, but competition from Home Depot, and merger from competitor Channel Home Centers led to a 1996 bankruptcy filing and liquidation and closure starting in late 1997 and continuing through early 1998.

The F. W. Woolworth Company aka Woolworth was one of the original five-and-dime stores. The first Woolworth store was opened by Frank Winfield Woolworth on February 22, 1879. Woolworth became one of the first American retailers to put merchandise out for the shopping public to handle and select without the assistance of a sales employee. The stores eventually incorporated lunch counters which became a signature of Woolworth. The shopping mall food court wouldn't be a thing without Woolworth. The last store closed in 1997 when the company changed directions and renamed itself Foot Locker. A Woolworth's building still exists in Bakersfield, California and operates as an antique store and includes a still-functioning diner.

Two Guys From Harrison (later shortened to Two Guys) is a former discount store chain founded in 1946 by brothers Herbert and Sidney Hubschman in Harrison, New Jersey. They originally sold major appliances like TVs. Eventually locations included a discount store with a supermarket, as well as complete hardware, major appliance, and automotive service departments. The Two Guys supermarkets were full sized "stores within a store." The last Two Guys closed its doors in 1982.

Korvettes was an American chain of discount department stores, founded in 1948 in New York City. It was one of the first department stores to challenge the "suggested retail price" method. Their record (what's a record?) and audio division became a hugely popular part of Korvettes. Unfortunatelly, the chain declared bancruptcy in 1980.

Jamesway was a chain of discount department stores based in Secaucus, New Jersey. It was founded in 1961 with a store in Jamestown, New York, and at its peak operated 138 stores in the Northeast and mid-Atlantic. Despite its successes, Jamesway faced money issues in its last years in business. This resulted in two bankruptcy filings which ultimately put an end to the chain in 1995.

Caldor, Inc. was a discount department store chain founded in 1951 by husband and wife Carl and Dorothy Bennett. After decades of expansion and success on January 9, 1999, Caldor announced it would not place any more orders and would not accept shipments of, new merchandise for their stores. Thirteen days later, on January 22, Caldor's chairman announced the company had no alternative but to wind down business and lay off all of their staff. Many Caldor stores eventually were purchased by retailers such as competitors Kmart, Target, and Walmart, and many metro New York Caldor stores were bought by Kohl's as part of Kohl's entry into the New York retail market.

H.L. GREEN CO.

Baseball state tournament: Breaking down the Central Jersey semifinals

The 2021 NJSIAA baseball tournament kicked off last week and produced memorable moments. In what was the most anticipated season in recent history, the tournament is now down to sectional semifinals on Tuesday. The NJ.com baseball staff previews the Central Jersey section of the state baseball tournament. The N.J. High School Sports newsletter now appearing in mailboxes 5 days a week. Sign up now and be among the first to get all the boys and girls sports...

The 2021 NJSIAA baseball tournament kicked off last week and produced memorable moments.

In what was the most anticipated season in recent history, the tournament is now down to sectional semifinals on Tuesday.

The NJ.com baseball staff previews the Central Jersey section of the state baseball tournament.

The N.J. High School Sports newsletter now appearing in mailboxes 5 days a week. Sign up now and be among the first to get all the boys and girls sports you care about, straight to your inbox each weekday.

12-Florence (8-8) at 1-Middlesex, 4

How Middlesex got here: defeated 16-Piscataway Tech, 16-0; defeated South Hunterdon, 6-0.

How Florence got here: Defeated Perth Amboy Tech, 15-4; defeated South Amboy, 7-4.

Florence players to watch: Dillon Sanfilippo, OF-P, Sr.; Matt Himm, OF-P, Sr.; Evan Lloyd,C, Sr.; Jake Fajgier, OF, So.; Nick Corsi, INF-P, Sr.

Middlesex players to watch: Ryan Vollmer OF, Sr.; Stephen Young, OF, Jr.; Kenny Yonker, P-OF, Sr.; Anthony Long, 3B-P, Sr; Avery West, 1B, Jr.; Raiden Yost, OF-P, Sr.; Ty Nicolay, OF, Jr.

Pick: Middlesex, 5-0

6-Point Pleasant Beach (13-7) at 2-New Egypt (13-7) , 4

How Point Beach got here: Defeated 11-Keyport, 13-0; defeated Riverside (25-1).

How New Egypt got here: Defeated 15-Henry Hudson, 11-0; defeated 7-Burlington City, 7-2.

Point Beach players to watch: Alec Glen, OF, Sr.; Hunter Alia, OF-P, Sr; David Terra-Nova, C, Sr.; Matt VanBrunt, 2B, Sr.; Jackson Killian, P, So.

New Egypt players to watch: Jake Siegel, P-C, Sr.; Michael Dolan, C, Sr.; Justin McKnight, P-1B, Sr.; Zachary Jenkins, 2B-C, So.; Jacob Kramer, SS, Jr.; Richard Trapanese, 3B, Jr.

Pick: New Egypt, 7-4.

4-Voorhees (21-4) at 1-Rumson-Fair Haven (17-5-1), 4

How Rumson-Fair Haven got here: Defeated 16-Bordentown, 11-1; defeated 8-Robbinsville, 6-0.

How Voorhees got here: Defeated Monmouth, 3-2; defeated Spotswood, 8-1.

Voorhees players to watch:Cole McGourty, Sr.; Max Klumpp, C., Sr.; Eric Axelsen, Sr.; Truman Richter, P, Jr.; Jake Knapp, Jr.;.

Rumson-Fair Haven players to watch: Thomas Elgrim, OF, Sr.; Reece Morony, INF, So.; Charlie Jones, P, Jr.; Matt Rigby, INF, Jr.; Andrew Schmid, OF, Sr.; Owen Keeney, C, So.

Pick: Rumson-Fair Haven, 2-1

11-Raritan at 2-Gov. Livingston, 4

How Raritan got here: Defeated 6-Delaware Valley, 9-3; defeated 3-South Plainfield, 6-1.

How Gov. Livingston got here: Defeated 15-Shore, 11-1; defeated 10-Holmdel, 13-6.

Raritan players to watch: Rob Scarola, OF-P, Jr; Chris Gon, Sr.; zalez, OF-P, Sr; Ben Hutchins, INF-P, Jr; Alex Dekis, OF, Jr.; Luke O’Hea, OF-P, Jr.

Gov. Livingston players to watch: Jack Pires, OF-P; Jayson Schmidy, OF, Sr.; Michael Shaffer, SS-P; Jon Schmidt, P-3B, So.; Matthew Murawski, C, Sr.

Pick: Gov. Livingston, 6-3.

5-Allentown (15-4) at 1-Colts Neck (20-6), 2:30

How Allentown got here: Defeated 12-Jackson Liberty, 1-0; defeated 5-Wall, 6-5.

How Colts Neck got here: Defeated 16-Lawrence, 7-4; defeated Middletown North, 8-1.

Allentown players to watch: Justin Marcario, SS, Sr.; Dan Merkel, P-OF, Sr.; Joey Dimono, P, Sr.; Matt Bethea, Sr.

Colts Neck players to watch: Joe Cilea, 3B-SS, Jr; Brad Salamone, UTL, Jr..

Pick: Colts Neck, 8-6.

7-Northern Burlington (19-5) at 3-Hamilton West (16-5), 4

How Northern Burlington got here: Defeated 10-Neptune, 2-0; defeated 15-Burlington Township 10-3.

How Hamilton West got here: Defeated 14-Red Bank Regional, 5-3; defeated Hopewell Valley, 2-1.

Northern Burlington players to watch: Nico Garnier, Jr.; CJ Fredericks, 1B, Jr.; Andrew Bressler, C, Jr.; Drew Wyers, SS, Jr.; Matteo Mannino, INF, Sr.; Ryan Dromboski, P, Sr.

Hamilton West players to watch: Danilo Perdomo, OF, Sr.; Natre Rodriguez, OF-P, Sr.; Mike Nielsen, 1B, Sr; Noel Olavarria, OF, Sr.; Tyler Williams, P-OF, Sr.; Dylan Parsons, P-OF, Jr.; James Hyman, P-OF, Sr.

Pick: Hamilton West, 5-3\

12-Old Bridge (9-17) at 9-Marlboro (14-7), 4

How Old Bridge got here: Defeated 5-South Brunswick, 6-2; defeated 13- Princeton, 8-1

How Marlboro got here: Defeated 8-Monroe, 11-4; defeated 1-Marlboro, 7-0

Old Bridge players to watch: Justin Gilman, P-OF, Sr.; Kyle McSorley, C, So.;

Colts Neck players to watch: Joe Cilea, 3B-SS, Jr; Brad Salamone, UTL, Jr.; Giancarlo Cangro, C, Sr.; Mike Villani, INF-P, So.; Justin Herbstman, P-OF, So.

Pick: Old Bridge, 4-2

3-Middletown South (17-8) at 2-Hunterdon Central (23-2), 4

How Middletown South got here: Defeated Montgomery, 3-0; defeated Freehold Township, 5-3.

How Hunterdon Central got here: Defeated 15-West Windsor-Plainsboro South, 4-2; defeated North Brunswick, 4-1.

Middletown South players to watch: Joe Stanzione, 1B, Sr; Ben Schild, P, So.; Kyle McCoy,

Hunterdon Central player to watch: Christian Petino, OF-P, Jr; Chase Fischer, 1B, Jr.; Kyle McCoy, P, Jr.; Nick Cznarecki, OF-P, Sr; Ryan Facinello, OF, Jr.; Brandon Padre, C, Jr.

Pick: Hunterdon Central, 3-0

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Joe Zedalis covers North and Central Jersey baseballl. He can be reached at jzedalis@njadvancemedia.com. Follow him on Twitter @Josephzedalis

What's happening in the Central Jersey area this weekend and beyond (June 4-10)

WHAT’S GOING ON? Here is a small sample of area happenings — some in-person, others online — you may want to check out in the coming days. Art/Museums JUNE 5 CLINTON Virtual Artist’s Talk, online presentation by current exhibitor Ann Clarke, 7 p.m., Hunterdon Art Museum. hunterdonartmuseum.org, 908-735-8415. JUNE 6 LAWRENCE “Windows of Hope,”...

WHAT’S GOING ON? Here is a small sample of area happenings — some in-person, others online — you may want to check out in the coming days.

Art/Museums

JUNE 5

CLINTON Virtual Artist’s Talk, online presentation by current exhibitor Ann Clarke, 7 p.m., Hunterdon Art Museum. hunterdonartmuseum.org, 908-735-8415.

JUNE 6

LAWRENCE “Windows of Hope,” opening of “Inside out” display of artwork in windows of participating businesses in partnership with HomeFront’s ArtSpace program, to be on exhibit through July 16. Downtown Lawrenceville lawrencevillemainstreet.com, 609-516-8376.

TRENTON Reopening, free “welcome back” presentation of 1677 deed signed by first English resident of the area, new exhibits, 2-4 p.m. 1719 William Trent House Museum, 15 Market St. williamtrenthouse.org, 609-989-0087.

Fairs/Festivals

JUNE 5-6

BORDENTOWN TWP. New Jersey Renaissance Faire, medieval-themed entertainment, food, activities including jousting and sword fighting, boat rides and vendors, 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Liberty Lake Day Camp, 1195 Florence-Columbus Road. $10 by advance purchase only; ages 4 and younger free. njrenfaire.com, huzzah@njrenfaire.com.

Home and Garden

ONGOING

PRINCETON Virtual Historical Society of Princeton House Tour, posting of on-demand online access to four private area homes, through June 15. Historical Society of Princeton. $20. princetonhistory.org, 609-921-6748. Registration required.

JUNE 5

FLORENCE Garden Tour, guided and self-guided options, self-guided tour 10 a.m.-3 p.m., with 1 p.m. guided tour, Roebling Museum, 100 Second Ave. in Roebling. $15. roeblingmuseum.org, 609-499-7200.

Music

JUNE 4

PRINCETON Music Concordia Chamber Players, video posting of prerecorded performance, 7 p.m., Princeton Festival, $25. princetonfestival.org, 609-759-1979.

JUNE 5

WEST WINDSOR Princeton Boychoir, live-streamed online “Journey On” spring concert, 7 p.m., with repeat on June 6, 4 p.m. Westrick Music Academy in Princeton Junction. $10 suggested donation. westrickmusic.org/upcoming, 609-688-1888.

JUNE 6

PRINCETON Moroccan Sheepherders, free outdoor concert in partnership with McCarter Theatre, 6 p.m., Palmer Square Green, Palmer Square off Nassau Street. palmersquare.com, 609-921-2853.

15th Annual Piano Competition, video posting of prerecorded performance, 3 p.m., Princeton Festival, $20. princetonfestival.org, 609-759-1979.

JUNE 8

PRINCETON Princeton Festival, in-person outdoor “Sacred and Profane” concert of chamber ensemble baroque music with works by Handel, Bach, Vivaldi, Biber, Vitali and others; also available online, 7 p.m., also June 10, 7 p.m. Morven Museum and Garden, 55 Stockton St. $45-$75 for 2-person pod; $25 for online stream. princetonfestival.org, 609-759-1979.

JUNE 10

HIGHTSTOWN The Knockabouts, free concert, 4 p.m. First United Methodist Church of Hightstown, 187 Stockton St. hightstownmethodist.org/hightstown-happenings.html, 616-610-5884.

Theater

JUNE 4

LAMBERTVILLE “The Fantasticks,” musical comedy about a boy, a girl and their two fathers who try to keep them apart, 8 p.m., also June 5-6, 3 p.m. Music Mountain Theatre, 1483 Route 179. $25. musicmountaintheatre.org, 609-397-3337.

Other

JUNE 4

FARMINGDALE “Once Upon a Time” Dinner, CFC Loud N Clear Foundation fundraiser, with silent auction, 7 p.m. Regan’s Hollow Farm, 260 Casino Drive. $125. one.bidpal.net/cfcgala/welcome, 848-992-3370.

NEW BRUNSWICK New Jersey International Film Festival, online streaming of more than 20 films, also June 5-6, Rutgers Film Co-op/New Jersey Media Arts Center, 4170 Academic Building, 15 Seminary Place. $12 per film; $75 festival pass. njfilmfest.com, 848-932-8482.

JUNE 5

LAWRENCE Saturday Morning Walking Club, Lawrence Hopewell Trail 2.7-mile group walk, weather permitting, 9:30 a.m. Village Park, 100 Maidenhead Lane. lhtrail.org.

PRINCETON Pride Princeton Community Picnic, family-friendly event with DJ, art activities, vendors, food trucks, giveaways and information on neighborhood nonprofits, 5 p.m. Princeton Family YMCA, 59 Paul Robeson Place. artscouncilofprinceton.org, 609-924-8777.

JUNE 6

DUNELLEN Open Air Market, Friends of the Dunellen Public Library fundraiser, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Dunellen Historical Society, 100 New Market Road. FriendsoftheDunellenPublicLibrary@gmail.com, FriendsoftheDunellenPublicLibrary@gmail.com.

JUNE 8

“Shore Surprises,” day to register for free virtual “Small Explorers” program for ages 5 and younger and their families to take place 11 a.m. June 12, New Jersey State Museum, 205 W. State St. forms.gle/8mFZtCvZ8vuqWFFy7, 609-292-6464.

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Princeton Memorial Park & Mausoleum - Robbinsville Cemetery

Princeton Memorial Park & Mausoleum has served the community for many years as a non-profit, non-sectarian cemetery. This beautiful cemetery was founded in 1967 and boasts a total of 20 acres, including sculptured landscapes and gardens of cherry blossom trees. The team works hard to provide families with full-service solutions when burying a loved one, including a variety of burial options to fit different traditions and ceremonies. Not only are cemetery burial plots and ...

Princeton Memorial Park & Mausoleum has served the community for many years as a non-profit, non-sectarian cemetery. This beautiful cemetery was founded in 1967 and boasts a total of 20 acres, including sculptured landscapes and gardens of cherry blossom trees. The team works hard to provide families with full-service solutions when burying a loved one, including a variety of burial options to fit different traditions and ceremonies.

Not only are cemetery burial plots and in-ground graves available from Princeton Memorial Park & Mausoleum, but families also have the option to choose from above-ground burial locations. The mausoleums elegance is a comfortable place for families to visit in honor of their loved ones. These mausoleums are available for either cremated ashes or intact remains, with the option to place multiple family members together in a private mausoleum. Other notable services include niches, a columbarium, crypts, and storing cremated remains. Burial programs are always personalized based on the requirements of each family, including tailoring to all manner of cultural and religious backgrounds.

These services include unique offerings, such as military honors and Veterans services when needed. Additionally, the helpful staff at Princeton Memorial Park & Mausoleum provides the family with on-demand care for immediate burial planning, as well as pre-planning services when desired. The cemetery staff offers more than burial care. They also provide the emotional support, and compassionate guidance families need during this difficult time. The goal is to help each family create the perfect final resting place to honor their loved one.

Princeton Memorial Park & Mausoleum serves families throughout New Jersey, including Robbinsville, Hamilton Township, Windsor, East Windsor, West Windsor, Trenton, Hightstown, Allentown, Millstone, and Lawrence Township. The cemetery offers large group programs for companies, organizations, unions, and churches of all faiths.

The stunning grounds at Princeton Memorial Park & Mausoleum are pristine throughout the year, with a high priority on maintaining the beauty and care of the gravesites. Families can visit the cemetery to learn more about available above-ground and below-ground burial options: 403 Gordon Rd Robbinsville, NJ 08691. Call at your convenience to talk to a burial expert and schedule a consultation to tour the cemetery: (732) 820-0211.

Robbinsville memorials

Robbinsville mausoleums

Robbinsville burials

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