Fire Damage
Restoration in Melissa, TX

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Elite Level Fire Damage Restoration in Melissa, TX

Fire damage to your home is one of the most traumatizing, frightening tragedies a person can experience. This is especially true in apartment buildings and multifamily homes, where dozens if not hundreds of families are affected by fire and smoke damage. When a fire rips through an apartment building, the property damage can be catastrophic. But the damage caused by fires doesn't end once the flames have been extinguished. Victims are left wondering what happens next now that their belongings are destroyed. When will they have a roof over their again?

In these circumstances, prompt, purpose-driven fire damage restoration is key to reducing victims' financial and emotional strain.

The National Fire Protection Association states that a structure fire is reported every 65 seconds. When the fire alarm sounds, emergency responders answer the call for help with decisive action. But once the smoke clears, Atlas National Renovations' team of fire restoration experts step in to give hope to property managers, apartment tenants, and commercial property owners.

With decades of combined experience in disaster recovery, ANR understands the complexities associated with commercial and apartment building fires. We have helped the top multifamily groups in Texas recover their tenants' homes and belongings with care and compassion. If you're a property manager and you're still reeling from a fire disaster, know that we're here to help you too.

At Atlas National Renovations, our expert project managers and technicians play key roles in complicated fire restoration projects. We specialize in restoring Class A, B, and C properties like apartment complexes, high-rise buildings, multifamily buildings, mixed-use developments, large commercial properties, and more.

Service Areas

If you're looking for a top-tier fire damage restoration company in Melissa, look no further than ANR. We're the top pick when it comes to large, detailed fire restoration projects because we:

  • Are a Trusted Partner in Restoration and Disaster Recovery
  • Adhere to OSHA Standards and State & Federal Regulations
  • Use the Latest Equipment & Remediation Techniques
  • Offer Innovative Solutions to Detailed Problems
  • Provide Seasoned Project Managers for Each Fire Restoration Project
  • Give Clients Clear and Consistent Communication
  • Work with Insurance Companies
  • Have a Knowledgeable & Courteous Leadership Team

Fire Damage Restoration for Apartment Buildings in Melissa, TX

Owners and managers of apartment complexes know that the safety of their tenants is a major responsibility. Unfortunately, nobody can completely control when apartment fires occur. Fires in apartments and multifamily buildings may start small, but they spread quickly, often destroying several living spaces. These frightening fires destroy prized heirlooms, important documents, and can even be fatal. However, the work is only beginning once the fire is put out and lives are saved.

In the aftermath of a disaster, figuring out the next steps is hard. During this difficult time, it's important to be prepared. As a property manager or owner, having a fire damage restoration company on your checklist of resources is crucial.

Unlike residential fires, apartment and multifamily building fires add several more layers of complexity and stress. In these situations, you deserve a restoration partner that you can trust without question, and that company is Atlas National Renovations.

Disaster Recovery Melissa, TX

With years of experience guiding our technicians and project managers, the ANS team responds quickly to your fire damage emergency. Using advanced protocols and state-of-the-art restoration equipment, we get to work quickly to repair and restore your commercial property to its pre-loss condition. While restoring your property, we always keep your tenant's care and comfort in mind.

Our fire restoration services in Melissa are comprehensive and include the following:

  • Rapid Mobilization and Response
  • Overall Catastrophe Management
  • Emergency Board-Up Services
  • Debris Removal and Disposal
  • Apartment Content Inventory and Cleaning
  • Soot and Smoke Removal Services
  • Water Extraction
  • Deodorization
  • HVAC Cleaning and Decontamination
  • Shoring Installment to Secure Buildings
  • Interior & Exterior Renovations

Our Fire Damage Restoration Process

It's imperative to have someone with knowledge and experience on your side during a fire crisis.

When you call ANS, our fire restoration experts can help walk you through the steps you need to take once a fire occurs. This allows us to quickly gain control of the restoration project on your behalf. Once we have inspected your property, we'll provide a detailed report and scope of work for your fire damage restoration project.

ANS repairs all property damage caused by soot, smoke, and fire. Our IICRC-certified fire restoration teams construct the best plan to quickly get your building back to its pre-loss condition.

 Renovations Melissa, TX

Because every property is different, each fire restoration project for apartment buildings is too. However, every fire disaster will have a similar process and will often include:

Contact ANS

Your fire restoration process begins when you call our headquarters. Our specialist will ask you a series of questions about the fire event that occurred. That way, we can arrive on-site with the proper resources and equipment.

Fire Damage Assessment
and Inspection

Our fire damage restoration team will carefully inspect the entirety of your apartment complex, from building to building and room to room. We do so to determine the extent of your apartment's fire, smoke, and soot damage. This step is crucial to developing a comprehensive restoration plan.

Board-Up Services

First responders like firefighters must break windows and cut holes in roofs to slow fire growth and save lives. Once the fire is out, our team can get to work, boarding up holes and constructing temporary fencing around the property.

Water Removal

If there is water damage associated with your apartment fire, we'll remove most of the water immediately. From there, we use air movers and dehumidifiers to help complete the drying process.

Smoke and Soot Removal

Within minutes of a fire, walls, electronics, and other surfaces are covered in soot. Smoke and ash continue to cause damage to every inch of your apartment building. That's why ANS uses specialized equipment to remediate smoke damage and remove odors. This process is often labor-intensive and can take time, especially for large fire damage restoration needs.

Cleaning and Sanitizing

Using a variety of restoration and cleaning techniques, our team will help clean restorable items and sanitize units for safety.

Restoration

Getting your apartment buildings to their pre-fire conditions is our ultimate goal. Depending on the size and scope of the fire restoration job, minor repairs like painting, drywall replacement, and new carpet installation might be needed. You might also need major structural renovations like re-siding, re-roofing, new window installation, floor replacement, and more.

Tips for Preventing Apartment Fires

If you're a property manager or own multifamily residential buildings, the thought of an apartment fire is terrifying. What starts as a small fire can quickly turn into a catastrophic event, with your entire complex up in flames. However, one of the best ways of preventing these fires is to know more about them.

Share these tips with tenants to help prevent deadly apartment fires:

Turn Off Heat Sources

Turn Off Heat Sources

Data shows that a large number of apartment fires begin with cooking. Often, these fires are caused by the ignition of common items like rags, curtains, wallpapers, and bags. Encourage tenants to keep their kitchens and cooking areas clear of combustibles. Never leave a stove unattended for long, and don't leave burners on by themselves. Unintentional mishaps like leaving heat sources on are common causes of fires that can be prevented with a little forethought.

Electrical Safety

Electrical Safety

Like heat sources, electrical malfunctions are also common causes of fires in apartment complexes. It's hard to prevent all electrical malfunctions, but you can tell tenants to avoid bad habits. Tips include never using extension cords as permanent solutions and never using a cable if the third prong is missing.

Appliance Safety

Appliance Safety

Appliances are a part of everyone's lives. They're also standard equipment in most apartment units. But if tenants don't take proper precautions, these useful tools can spark deadly fires.

Tips for Preventing Apartment Fires

No matter how large or small, fires are nightmare scenarios for entrepreneurs with commercial properties. Fire damage can completely ruin storefronts and offices, leaving charred remains and burned-up files before firefighters arrive. To make matters worse, soot and smoke damage ruin your businesses' furniture, HVAC system, carpet, walls, and windows.

To eliminate health hazards and restore your business to its pre-fire condition, you need to bring in a team of professionals with years of experience in fire damage remediation. At ANR, we use commercial-grade equipment and cutting-edge tools to clean up the aftermath of your fire and rebuild your property. That way, you can get back to running your business and providing for your family.

 Apartment Renovations Melissa, TX

Share these tips with tenants to help prevent deadly apartment fires:

Remove Smoke and Fire Damage

 Home Renovations Melissa, TX

One of the most common causes of large commercial loss stems from smoke and fire damage. Of course, these disasters cause injuries and fatalities. But they also generate tremendous amounts of damage, rot, mold, and harm to structures. Not to mention the devastation that fire damage has to the appearance and livability of the facility. Fire damage restoration companies restore - and also prevent - the root cause of the fire. Electrical outlets, wires, and other fire-prone items will all be addressed to prevent a subsequent disaster.

Highly Skilled

 Home Restorations Melissa, TX

The best fire damage restoration professionals are highly-trained, exceptionally skilled, and properly equipped to deal with every aspect of a commercial fire. From handling major renovations to taking care of the lingering effects of smoke damage, pro fire restoration companies take care of it for you. Hiring ANR means you'll be working with technicians who have the knowledge, tools, and materials to get the job done right the first time.

Insurance Claims

 Multifamily Home Renovations Melissa, TX

When you start the claim process with your businesses' insurance company, they'll ask whether you've hired a fire damage restoration company. That's because companies like Atlas prevent further damage from occurring and calculate an estimate of your total loss. You can submit this estimate to your insurance company, which may then provide you with resources to complete your company's disaster recovery mt-md-1

Discover the
Atlas Difference

Fire damage restoration is a crucial, complex process that professionals must perform. With decades of expertise, unmatched restoration quality, and the scalability for any job, Atlas National Renovations is well-equipped to be your single source for commercial fire damage restoration in Melissa, TX. We are specially equipped to make difficult restoration projects easy for owners.

When a fire disaster strikes, you need a timely response from a trustworthy team of experts. Don't settle for a mediocre fire restoration partner. Choose ANR to get the job done right the first time. Contact our office today to learn more about our fire restoration services in the Dallas-Fort Worth metroplex.

Homes-for-Sale-phone-number214-814-4300

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Latest News in Melissa, TX

N.J. notables reflect on lifetime of memories made at the Jersey Shore

The smell of the crisp ocean air. The taste of that creamy chocolate fudge. The sound of the hypnotic crashing waves. The sight of the towering Ferris wheel lighting up the night sky. There truly is no place more magical than the Jersey Shore. And, as is tradition for many families, parents and grandparents vividly share nostalgic stories from their youth spent visiting their favorite beach town. Then the cycle continues when the new generation recreates those beautiful memories spent down the Shore. The Garden State’s glitterin...

The smell of the crisp ocean air. The taste of that creamy chocolate fudge. The sound of the hypnotic crashing waves. The sight of the towering Ferris wheel lighting up the night sky. There truly is no place more magical than the Jersey Shore. And, as is tradition for many families, parents and grandparents vividly share nostalgic stories from their youth spent visiting their favorite beach town. Then the cycle continues when the new generation recreates those beautiful memories spent down the Shore.

The Garden State’s glittering coastline leaves a lasting impression on all who visit. We chatted with some of New Jersey’s most notable residents and asked them to share some of their memories and favorite moments spent at the Shore. From the Asbury Park music scene, to Brigantine Castle, to crabbing in Barnegat Bay — there’s surely a special memory we all have in common when it comes to the Jersey Shore.

Junot Diaz, Pulitzer Prize-winning author

“I was a Dominican kid who grew up in Parlin. The Shore was an obsession of mine. It brought me back to the Caribbean I had lost. I feel like I had a different Shore for nearly every stage of my life. I’m old enough to remember Brigantine Castle (“It’s alive!”), but in truth my family’s go-to beaches were Sandy Hook or Seaside. In high school, I spent the happiest summer of my adolescence at a friend’s house in Lavallette; swimming, eating Taylor ham, capsizing his sailboat and being called a ‘Benny.’ Later in college, I fell in love with Wildwood and set a section of my first novel there. I said it before, and I’ll say it again: the Shore is where New Jersey, for better or worse, meets itself. In my case, mostly for better.”

Tim McLoone, restaurateur

“My parents were from Brooklyn, so our early summers were spent at Breezy Point and Rockaway Point, N.Y. until I was a sophomore in high school. Then we discovered many of the Shore towns. Asbury Park was a mysterious place with its carney-like atmosphere and beachfront arcade games, which were great for kids, but my parents gravitated to Sea Girt and Spring Lake — more for the restaurants than anything. It was a big deal if we stayed at the Stockton Inn, which later burned down, for a few nights a summer.

“When I became a full-time musician in 1970, that completely changed my relationship with the Shore. Now, I was part of ‘the scene’ with my bands, starting with a place in Fair Haven called the Lock, Stock & Barrel and then taking up a summer residency with the band at the Driftwood Beach Club in Sea Bright, playing there four nights a week for many years. Now I was fully immersed in the Jersey Shore world, and I never left.

“From a musician’s standpoint, it was a somewhat rowdy world but it was also pretty inclusive, and we helped define the nightlife experience so many people came to love. It was only in 2007 that we became part of the Asbury Park music world when we opened up the Tim McLoone’s Supper Club on the boardwalk in the old Howard Johnson’s building.”

Former Gov. Chris Christie

“During my childhood, we went to probably three different places over time. When I was very young, we went to Asbury Park. And then once I got into fifth or sixth grade, we started going to Seaside Park and Ortley Beach. I loved Seaside Park. I had a lot of friends in the area, and we used to go and meet at a place called Barnacle Bill’s on rainy days. Our parents would give us a few dollars to play arcade games. I also had a cousin down there who had a boat, and he taught us how to go crabbing in Barnegat Bay. We would also spend a lot of time playing Wiffle ball on the beach.

“When I was governor, we would go to the governor’s beach house, which is on Island Beach State Park. Then, after I left office, we bought a house in Bay Head. Every year we always have a big Fourth of July Wiffle ball game going back to even when my brother and I were young. We have always had an open door policy. There’s hardly a weekend I can think of where we don’t have our friends or friends of my children who are there. I always think that having more people down the Shore with you just leads to more really great memories. I can’t tell you how many nights last summer we were up late with friends playing a board game, having a big card game, making s’mores over the fire pit or just listening to music and dancing. All those memories become much more vivid when you share them with more people.

“The biggest satisfaction that came for me during my eight years as governor was being able to rebuild the Jersey Shore after Superstorm Sandy. It was so heartbreaking to see what had happened to the Shore in the aftermath of the storm. Because it was a huge part of my childhood, it made me even more determined to make sure we were going to rebuild and rebuild quickly. The most gratifying thing was being able to do that so that people are not losing the chance to continue to have those memories built for their children and their grandchildren on the Jersey Shore.”

Photo courtesy of NJ Advance Media

Gov. Phil Murphy and First Lady Tammy Murphy

Gov. Murphy: “I wouldn’t call it the Shore per se, but we kind of live on the Shore. We’re in Middletown on the Navesink River, so we’re probably 3 or 4 miles from the ocean. When our kids were young and growing up, we would be at a beach club about 3 or 4 miles away from the ocean all the time. But over the past several years since I’ve been governor, we spent a lot of time at Island Beach State Park, which we love, and we think is one of the incredible gems of the Shore.”

First Lady: “When our kids were young, we used to go down to Point Pleasant and go to the boardwalk or Jenkinson’s Aquarium.”

Gov. Murphy: “As the kids have gotten older, we go for runs now with them on the boardwalk in Seaside Park, and we hang out on the boardwalk in Seaside Heights together. We love Ocean City, and we also love Cape May. We spent a fair amount of time over the years in Atlantic City. In Atlantic City, we stay in one hotel, then have dinner at another, and we typically go to the sportsbook at a third. So, we’re trying to parse out our time fairly.”

First Lady: “For a lot of families, the Jersey Shore is part of their fabric. Once you have gone there, you realize how relaxed it is and how beautiful it is. You make memories there, and you just keep going back and keep going back. So, it becomes a family tradition. And I think that’s one reason that people just love going there because it’s got that flavor.”

Gov. Murphy: “The Jersey Shore has got some of the best beaches in America, if not the world. You’ve also got great communities. It’s not just great beaches. It’s also got great restaurants and entertainment. Asbury Park, Atlantic City and Ocean City are great examples. You go to other places in our country and you may have nice beaches, but it’s rare that you get the actual community sitting literally at the edge of the beach, and we have that up and down the Shore.”

Photo courtesy of Melissa Gorga

Melissa Gorga, television personality and businesswoman

I actually grew up down the Shore in Toms River. My family and friends would all get annoyed when the town became so crowded in the summer. Every Sunday, in the spring and summer, I would go to the boardwalk with my family or friends. The Jersey Shore is so special to me because I have so many amazing memories growing up there, and now I am creating more memories with my children. My husband, Joe, and I have a home on the bay in Toms River with a pool, so we spend a lot of time hanging in the backyard and we’re always cooking up something delicious. I love to bring my kids to get donuts from OB-CO’s in Toms River, where I used to go when I was young.”

Kelly Dillon is a traffic reporter and fashion influencer who covers a variety of lifestyle topics, including pop culture, travel and events.

This article originally appeared in the Summer 2021 issue of Jersey’s Best. Subscribe here for in-depth access to everything that makes the Garden State great.

Westfield Optimist Club's Awards Include Recognition of School Nurses in COVID

WESTFIELD, NJ — The Optimist Club of Westfield this week recognized two Edison Intermediate School teachers, two Roosevelt Intermediate School teachers and for the first time created a Special Nurse’s Award for performance during the pandemic. The nonprofit service organization that supports youth and the community recognized Edison Intermediate School language arts teachers Marc Lazarow and Kimberly Swenson, and Roosevelt Intermediate School science teacher Melissa Czerwinski and language arts teacher Carine Helwig as out...

WESTFIELD, NJ — The Optimist Club of Westfield this week recognized two Edison Intermediate School teachers, two Roosevelt Intermediate School teachers and for the first time created a Special Nurse’s Award for performance during the pandemic.

The nonprofit service organization that supports youth and the community recognized Edison Intermediate School language arts teachers Marc Lazarow and Kimberly Swenson, and Roosevelt Intermediate School science teacher Melissa Czerwinski and language arts teacher Carine Helwig as outstanding intermediate school educators, the school district announced.

“The Optimist Award recognizes teachers who provide an educationally stimulating and supporting environment during this critical stage of adolescence,” said Superintendent Margaret Dolan in a statement. “I thank the Optimist Club for honoring our health educators/nurses as well during this challenging year.”

A committee that included club members, school district administrators and past award recipients selected the four teachers this year to receive the 23rd Annual Optimist Club Award, which recognizes the importance of teaching at the intermediate level, the district said

The Optimist Club’s newly created Special Nurse’s Award went to nurse/health educators Martha Fico and Patricia Kelly at Edison School, and Christine DeSousa and Sharon Dorry at Roosevelt School.

“The Optimist Club created a Special Nurse’s Award for intermediate school nurses for outstanding performance during the 2020-2021 school year in ensuring that COVID-19 health and safety protocols were established and closely followed to provide a safe learning and working environments for all students and staff,” the district said in a statement.

Email Matt Kadosh at mkadosh@tapinto.net | Twitter: @MattKadosh

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Girls track & field Top 20 for June 18: Last look before Meet of Champions

The NJSIAA Meet of Champions is tomorrow, which means it’s our second-to-last edition of the NJ.com Top 20 for the outdoor track season. On the girls end, the top teams showed out on the track and grass in groups while others competed hard and made a case for recognition. Let’s dive in. Last week: No. 1 The Vikings won their sixth-straight group title in Neptune last weekend going away, outscoring second-place Paramus Catholic 189-62. Last week: No. 2 Haddonfield won group ...

The NJSIAA Meet of Champions is tomorrow, which means it’s our second-to-last edition of the NJ.com Top 20 for the outdoor track season.

On the girls end, the top teams showed out on the track and grass in groups while others competed hard and made a case for recognition.

Let’s dive in.

Last week: No. 1

The Vikings won their sixth-straight group title in Neptune last weekend going away, outscoring second-place Paramus Catholic 189-62.

Last week: No. 2

Haddonfield won group title No. 8 on Saturday, fending off tough competition from Demarest, Manchester Township, Holmdel, Delsea and others.

Last week: No. 8

Colts Neck collected its first group crown last weekend thanks to junior Lilly Shapiro in the distance events as well as the 4x400 and 4x800-meter relay quartets.

Last week: No. 12

Demarest hung tough with the second-ranked team in the state in Haddonfield, coming away with 67 points, second to the Bulldawgs’ 70.

Last week: No. 13

Egg Harbor had its best Saturday at last weekend’s Group 4 meet with the stars shining across many events and lifting the program to its first group title.

Last week: No. 6

SPF took second to Egg Harbor at the Group 4 meet and the Vikings’ sprinting core will look to find more gold on tomorrow’s M of C stage.

Last week: No. 4

Hillsborough saw just sixth place at Group 4, but let’s not forget how balanced this team is and all that it accomplished.

Last week: No. 9

The Highlanders racked up 50 points in a second-place finish in Group 3 as seniors Brynn Madonna and Randi Conroy and junior Molly Bennett supplied most of the team’s points.

Last week: No. 3

Ridge looked human last weekend, finishing 14th in Group 4 with 16 points.

Last week: No. 11

Winslow took third in groups behind Colts Neck and Northern Highlands, but it was ahead of tough programs in Mendham, Old Tappan and Middletown North.

Last week: 16

This bunch ran away with the Group 1 title. It’s a season of firsts for the Clippers and the Sharpe sisters will hope to keep their magic going at the M of Cs.

Last week: No. 17

Manchester Township emerged from a stacked Group 2 with a third-place finish in the team standings.

Last week: 15

This group was just five points behind Manchester Township and had two strong weeks to finish team competition.

Last week: No. 7

Delsea took fifth in Group 2 and in the events it normally scores better in, the buzzsaw of Haddonfield, Demarest, Manchester Township and Holmdel was too much.

Last week: Unranked

The Mountaineers flashed some of the potential they showed earlier in the season, taking third in Group 4 and succeeding in the field events, as they usually do.

Last week: No. 10

The Maroons’ T19th-place finish at groups will be seen by outsiders as disappointing, but their primary avenue of points in the distance events was obstructed by Westfield senior Katie Hamilton and the rest of the strong field in Somerset.

Last week: Unranked

Mendham has one of the best field athletes in the state in junior Melissa Aymil while trotting out a strong core in a majority of the distance events, so a late-season emergence was always in the realm.

Last week: No. 5

Rancocas Valley was tied for 24th in Group 4 and like Ridgewood but in the field events, the talent and depth of the group was too much to rack up big points like it would at a normal meet.

Last week: Unranked

The Farmers’ senior sprinting duo of Joy Enaohwo and Azariah Grantham made them a contender in a tough Group 4 all season and junior Leyila Fadael will move on to the M of C in the triple jump.

Last week: No. 20

Montclair was eighth in Group 4 with 23 points and will send multiple athletes to next week’s M of C.

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Turtle rescue, rehabilitation groups working overtime this season

Turtle nesting season has begun, and after the first sea turtle nest was spotted on Seabrook Island, the turtle teams with South Carolina’s Department of Natural Resources (DNR) and other conservation organizations are combing state beaches for sick, injured or lost turtles in need of assistance. But, one turtle rescue group based in the Lowcountry with a reach that spans the globe says for them, it’s always turtle season. “For the Turtle Survival Alliance (TSA), since we work around the world, the work never ...

Turtle nesting season has begun, and after the first sea turtle nest was spotted on Seabrook Island, the turtle teams with South Carolina’s Department of Natural Resources (DNR) and other conservation organizations are combing state beaches for sick, injured or lost turtles in need of assistance.

But, one turtle rescue group based in the Lowcountry with a reach that spans the globe says for them, it’s always turtle season.

“For the Turtle Survival Alliance (TSA), since we work around the world, the work never stops,” said TSA outreach coordinator Jordan Gray. “But as far as the acute turtle season in the Lowcountry, we’re definitely in it. We’ve been getting different calls about turtles crossing the roads and hatchlings being found in people’s pool drains and yards.”

While turtle nesting season primarily refers to marine turtles — like the loggerheads, found on Seabrook Island — the TSA typically deals with land-based and freshwater turtles. Turtle season runs the gamut for species, meaning even residents far from the beach may find nests in their yards and hatchlings in the streets.

Not all of these turtles are in need of as much care or assistance as some may think, Gray said.

“We get a lot of calls or emails about turtles who aren’t injured, and people are just wondering what they need to do,” he said. “We treat every call on a case-by-case basis and try to help them have the best end result — whether that’s getting the turtle back to its native habitat or coming up with another best-case scenario for the life of that turtle.”

As with many wild animals, more times than not, the best thing someone can do is to leave the turtles alone.

“That mother turtle came up and laid eggs in your yard, or near your home, for a reason,” Gray said. “Just release any hatchlings back into your yard, at the edge of the marsh — wherever you found them. Because you’re talking about animals that have evolved over millions of years, these animals know very much what to do without human intervention.”

But sometimes, intervention is necessary, especially in cases of injury, illness or other harm due to human influence in the first place. That’s where organizations like the TSA and the S.C. Aquarium’s Turtle Care Center (TCC) come in.

Marine turtles are often found in more precarious situations than their terrestrial counterparts, due to the conditions of the shores they hatch on. Disturbances near sea turtle nests in the sand, trash left on beaches and even bright lights from nearby buildings can lead to injury or disorientation.

“When they hatch, the turtles are looking for the reflection of the moon on the water, and if people are behind them with brighter lights, they could go in the wrong direction,” said TCC manager Melissa Ranly. “And aside from hatchlings, a nesting female wants to find a spot where there’s nothing that could endanger her young.”

When marine turtles do end up in trouble the TCC is equipped with a full rehabilitation center.

“We help rehabilitate sick and injured sea turtles from all over the state,” Ranly said. “We’ll get a call from the DNR and they’ll let us know about the animal so we can get prepared for intake. It’s sort of what you would consider a triage — we have to examine the animal and get a feeling for the extent of the injuries. Those first moments are critical, so we just jump into action.”

Their equipment allows the team to get instant results, and they can even run blood work in-house. Most of the time they find debilitations like dehydration or malnutrition, which can disrupt the turtle’s immune system. So, the first steps usually involve antibiotics and vitamins.

In more extreme cases, like being hooked by a fisherman or hit by a boat, the turtle may need surgery. In these cases, it’s even more important for those who discover the injured turtle to leave it be and contact someone who can help. Moving a turtle that may have a fracture or internal injuries can cause more harm than good.

No matter what kind of turtle you may have come across, whether it be sick, injured or healthy, there are a few crucial steps to follow:

Call an expert. Turtle rescue organizations like the TSA usually have direct contacts. The TSA can be reached at (843) 724-9763 or at info@turtlesurvival.org; in the case of marina turtles, the TCC recommends contacting the DNR’s 24-hour hotline: 1-800-922-5431.

Stay with the turtle. Beachgoers who find sea turtle hatchlings are the first line of defense, Gray said. So after calling the DNR, it’s important to remain where you are to help guide their turtle teams to the turtle in need.

Listen to instructions. When calling an expert, oftentimes they may give you instruction on how to best handle the turtle you’ve found. In these cases, it’s important to listen to those who know better than you as far as caring for these animals.

Turtle rescue, rehabilitation groups working overtime this season

Turtle nesting season has begun, and after the first sea turtle nest was spotted on Seabrook Island, the turtle teams with South Carolina’s Department of Natural Resources (DNR) and other conservation organizations are combing state beaches for sick, injured or lost turtles in need of assistance. But, one turtle rescue group based in the Lowcountry with a reach that spans the globe says for them, it’s always turtle season. “For the Turtle Survival Alliance (TSA), since we work around the world, the work never ...

Turtle nesting season has begun, and after the first sea turtle nest was spotted on Seabrook Island, the turtle teams with South Carolina’s Department of Natural Resources (DNR) and other conservation organizations are combing state beaches for sick, injured or lost turtles in need of assistance.

But, one turtle rescue group based in the Lowcountry with a reach that spans the globe says for them, it’s always turtle season.

“For the Turtle Survival Alliance (TSA), since we work around the world, the work never stops,” said TSA outreach coordinator Jordan Gray. “But as far as the acute turtle season in the Lowcountry, we’re definitely in it. We’ve been getting different calls about turtles crossing the roads and hatchlings being found in people’s pool drains and yards.”

While turtle nesting season primarily refers to marine turtles — like the loggerheads, found on Seabrook Island — the TSA typically deals with land-based and freshwater turtles. Turtle season runs the gamut for species, meaning even residents far from the beach may find nests in their yards and hatchlings in the streets.

Not all of these turtles are in need of as much care or assistance as some may think, Gray said.

“We get a lot of calls or emails about turtles who aren’t injured, and people are just wondering what they need to do,” he said. “We treat every call on a case-by-case basis and try to help them have the best end result — whether that’s getting the turtle back to its native habitat or coming up with another best-case scenario for the life of that turtle.”

As with many wild animals, more times than not, the best thing someone can do is to leave the turtles alone.

“That mother turtle came up and laid eggs in your yard, or near your home, for a reason,” Gray said. “Just release any hatchlings back into your yard, at the edge of the marsh — wherever you found them. Because you’re talking about animals that have evolved over millions of years, these animals know very much what to do without human intervention.”

But sometimes, intervention is necessary, especially in cases of injury, illness or other harm due to human influence in the first place. That’s where organizations like the TSA and the S.C. Aquarium’s Turtle Care Center (TCC) come in.

Marine turtles are often found in more precarious situations than their terrestrial counterparts, due to the conditions of the shores they hatch on. Disturbances near sea turtle nests in the sand, trash left on beaches and even bright lights from nearby buildings can lead to injury or disorientation.

“When they hatch, the turtles are looking for the reflection of the moon on the water, and if people are behind them with brighter lights, they could go in the wrong direction,” said TCC manager Melissa Ranly. “And aside from hatchlings, a nesting female wants to find a spot where there’s nothing that could endanger her young.”

When marine turtles do end up in trouble the TCC is equipped with a full rehabilitation center.

“We help rehabilitate sick and injured sea turtles from all over the state,” Ranly said. “We’ll get a call from the DNR and they’ll let us know about the animal so we can get prepared for intake. It’s sort of what you would consider a triage — we have to examine the animal and get a feeling for the extent of the injuries. Those first moments are critical, so we just jump into action.”

Their equipment allows the team to get instant results, and they can even run blood work in-house. Most of the time they find debilitations like dehydration or malnutrition, which can disrupt the turtle’s immune system. So, the first steps usually involve antibiotics and vitamins.

In more extreme cases, like being hooked by a fisherman or hit by a boat, the turtle may need surgery. In these cases, it’s even more important for those who discover the injured turtle to leave it be and contact someone who can help. Moving a turtle that may have a fracture or internal injuries can cause more harm than good.

No matter what kind of turtle you may have come across, whether it be sick, injured or healthy, there are a few crucial steps to follow:

Call an expert. Turtle rescue organizations like the TSA usually have direct contacts. The TSA can be reached at (843) 724-9763 or at info@turtlesurvival.org; in the case of marina turtles, the TCC recommends contacting the DNR’s 24-hour hotline: 1-800-922-5431.

Stay with the turtle. Beachgoers who find sea turtle hatchlings are the first line of defense, Gray said. So after calling the DNR, it’s important to remain where you are to help guide their turtle teams to the turtle in need.

Listen to instructions. When calling an expert, oftentimes they may give you instruction on how to best handle the turtle you’ve found. In these cases, it’s important to listen to those who know better than you as far as caring for these animals.

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